Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Based on this awnser: How can I determine the direction of a jQuery scroll event?

I did a function like this:

tempScrollTop=0;
$.fn.cool = function(options){
    windowTop = $(window).scrollTop(); 

    if (tempScrollTop < windowTop ){
        //scroll down
    }
    else if (tempScrollTop > windowTop ){
        //scroll up
    }

    tempScrollTop = windowTop;
};

but each time I try to use my function

 $(window).scroll(function(e) {
    $("#element1").cool();
    $("#element2").cool();
 }

$("#element2") takes the global variable tempScrollTop already modified by $("#element1") and for element 2 tempScrollTop and windowTop has the same value, so my function doesn't work.

Any ideas on what can I do? I dont want to create n functions one for each element.

share|improve this question
    
Why would you need to check the scrolling direction of the window on each element ? –  adeneo Dec 4 '12 at 16:02
    
Why are you setting a global variable? Shouldn't you be returning the value of windowTop from the function call and using that return value? –  Joe Green Dec 4 '12 at 16:07
    
@adeneo. I need the scrolling direction to move the element up or down depending on the event. –  Gaddiel Sadoc Peralta Dec 4 '12 at 16:15
    
@JoeGreen. I need the global variable bc of the implementation of this awnser link. do you think there is any other better method? –  Gaddiel Sadoc Peralta Dec 4 '12 at 16:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems that what you actually want to do is:

$("#element1","#element2").cool();

Then in your cool function:

tempScrollTop=0;
$.fn.cool = function(options){
windowTop = $(window).scrollTop(); 

if (tempScrollTop < windowTop ){
    //scroll down
    this.each(function() {
        // do stuff with each selected element $(this)
    });
}
else if (tempScrollTop > windowTop ){
    //scroll down
    this.each(function() {
        // do stuff with each selected element $(this)
    });
}

tempScrollTop = windowTop;
};

More info on plugin authoring here.

Another way would be to separate the scroll calculation from the action on the elements:

$(window).scroll(function(e) {
    var scrollDiff=calculateScroll();
    $("#element1").cool(scrollDiff);
    $("#element2").cool(scrollDiff);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This does not solve the question about using a global variable. This is exactly the same than calling both separated. –  Capagris Dec 4 '12 at 16:17
    
@Capagris certainly not! With my code the scroll is only calculated once. –  Christophe Dec 4 '12 at 16:19
    
You are right if calculated once and always together. Nevertheless, I would still go for a solution that allows using each scrolling element independently. –  Capagris Dec 4 '12 at 16:28
    
@Capagris but the whole point is that they don't scroll independently :-) –  Christophe Dec 4 '12 at 16:34
    
@Christophe I m tring to use your answer but it says "Cannot read property 'top' of undefined" how do you use $(this) in your implementation... and is something like $(this).children(funcion... ??? –  Gaddiel Sadoc Peralta Dec 4 '12 at 16:38
var tempScrollTop = 0,
    innerScrollTop;
    $.fn.cool = function(options){
        var $this = $(this);
        innerScrollTop = $this.data('scrollTop') || tempScrollTop;

        windowTop = $(window).scrollTop();

        if (innerScrollTop <= windowTop ){
            //scroll down
        } else {
            //scroll up
        }

        $this.data('scrollTop', windowTop);
    };
share|improve this answer
    
no, sorry it was my error that code is not a copy paste, is an example made for stackoverflow, but thank you on pointing out, (I m removing it from the original question) –  Gaddiel Sadoc Peralta Dec 4 '12 at 16:10
1  
You would need to modify tempScrollTop in the if to this.tempScrollTop. Apart from that, it is a good answer. Nevertheless, there is no explanation when this page should not just contain code but a way of learning for beginners. What Michael is proposing is to add the information of the current situation of the scroll to the object itself through this. That makes this solution suitable for multiple scrolls, at the same time that we write it only once into an anonymous function which will decide on runtime which object is being affected. –  Capagris Dec 4 '12 at 16:11
    
this code: this.tempScrollTop = this.tempScrollTop || tempScrollTop; somehow this.tempScrollTop is always taking 0 (guess the seccond option) –  Gaddiel Sadoc Peralta Dec 4 '12 at 17:09
    
Changed saving scroll from this.tempScrollTop to $(element).data('scrollTop'); –  Michael Malinovskij Dec 4 '12 at 17:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.