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I came across a really strange bug with Javascript on NodeJS.

I have a huge data.json file (24MB). I read it via

var data = JSON.parse(fs.readFileSync("./data.json", 'utf8'));

However, at some point during the script execution, I try to access, for example,

data['someProp']['prop1']

and it raises a type error:

TypeError: Cannot read property 'prop1' of undefined

It is really strange because data, data['someProp'], data['someProp']['prop1'] are all defined.

If I do

console.log(data['someProp']['prop1']);

it displays the value of data['someProp']['prop1'] on the screen correctly and raises a type error immediately.

What might cause this strange behaviour? Any guess or tip to fix such a problem?


Update:

Let me be a bit clearer. I find it strange because if I put

console.log(data['someProp']['prop1']);

in the line just above where it raised the error, it correctly prints out the value and immediately raises an error.

Let's say data['someProp']['prop1'] = "someProp value".

Then this is the error log.

someProp value

console.log(data['someProp']['prop1']);
                        ^

TypeError: Cannot read property 'prop1' of undefined

So if I do

console.log(data['someProp'])

Then this is the log I get:

{
  ...
  "someProp": {
    "prop1": "someProp value"
  },
  ...
}
undefined

This is the part I'm confused. When I console.log it, it prints out the contents of data['someProp'] followed immediately by undefined. What can cause this?

Another strange thing is

console.log(typeof data['someProp']);

The result is:

object
undefined

How can data['someProp'] be object as well as undefined?

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2  
"...at some point during the script execution..." Well that would seem to be the key, wouldn't it. If it's telling you that it's undefined, then that means it's undefined. Either you're running the code before it's defined, or you're accessing properties incorrectly. Either way, the issue can't be known from what you've provided. –  I Hate Lazy Dec 4 '12 at 17:16
    
take a look at this question, it has a function to call properties on n levels and returns empty string if it is null. stackoverflow.com/questions/13345449/… –  Rodrigo Dias Dec 4 '12 at 17:20
1  
Could you post some of your code verbatim? –  UpTheCreek Dec 4 '12 at 17:41
4  
The return value of console.log is undefined. That's not part of what's being logged. If you do console.log("foo"), you'll get "foo" undefined. Regarding your issue, we need a working example to see what's going on. Seems like there may be some async code in play –  I Hate Lazy Dec 4 '12 at 17:45
1  
@user1689607 Hey, as you guessed, the code involves some async code. And while I was debugging just now, I realized that when I call done() callback, I didn't return. I fixed those async issues and the problem is resolved now. Thanks! –  Brian Park Dec 4 '12 at 18:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Okay, I'll answer my own question and close this question.

As user1689607 guessed, there was a bug with my async code. For example, my code looked like:

function test(done) {
  ...
  if (err) {
    done();
  }
  ...
  if (data['someProp']['prop1']) {
    ...
    done();
  }
}

Since the first done() was called without return, I think it comes back at the end of the callback execution and goes through the rest of the code, which it shouldn't. During that time, there has been some changes to data and that's what caused the error.

So return done(); fixed the problem.

Thanks @user1689607.

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