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I have a problem with strict aliasing in C. I'm using GCC 4.7.1.

Example 1:
When compiling this code with -fstrict-aliasing -Wstrict-aliasing=3 I get "warning: dereferencing type-punned pointer will break strict-aliasing rules"

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int main(void)
{
    uint8_t a[4] = {0x01, 0x23, 0x45, 0x67};
    uint32_t b;

    b = *(uint32_t *)a;

    printf("%x\n", b);

    return(0);
}


Example 2:
This code gives no warning with -fstrict-aliasing and -Wstrict-aliasing=3 or -Wstrict-aliasing=2 or -Wstrict-aliasing=1

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

int main(void)
{
    uint8_t a[4] = {0x01, 0x23, 0x45, 0x67};
    uint32_t b;
    void *p;

    p = a;
    b = *(uint32_t *)p;

    printf("%x\n", b);

    return(0);
}


Both examples work correctly.

Using union is also undefined behavior and using memcpy() is too slow in my case.
So, is the first example safe (false positive) or second example is also unsafe (false negative) or ...?

Thanks.

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1  
Using unions for type-punning is explicitly allowed by C99 TC3 footnote 82. –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 4 '12 at 18:38
    
Good to know. Thanks! –  LightBit Dec 4 '12 at 19:08
3  
Aliasing is not your problem here, alignment is. There is no guaratee that an array of uint8_t aka unsigned char is aligned such that you can read it through a pointer to uint32_t. Don't do that, you are heading for trouble. (The other way round is ok.) –  Jens Gustedt Dec 4 '12 at 19:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to manufacture a uint32_t from 4 uint8_t, then do just that: manufacture it. Don't try to pull one from something that isn't one by pointer casts. The code you presented will vary in results depending on whether you're platform is little or big endian, not to mention its just plain wrong.

They're both bad. Both samples provided are unsafe no matter what. data alignment requirements are bypassed with such casts. If anything you're casting 'to' requires potentially more restrictive alignment than anything you're casting 'from', you inviting a bus-error. Heed the initial warning. intermediate pointer-to-void simply masks the problem (as it does for most problems).

You want to know what byte is going "where" when you build that uin32_t.

uint8_t a[4] = {0x01, 0x23, 0x45, 0x67};
uint32_t b = ((uint32_t)a[0] << 24) |
             ((uint32_t)a[1] << 16) |
             ((uint32_t)a[2] << 8) |
             (uint32_t)a[3];

This will always put the a[0] byte in the high-byte of the target 32bit unsigned, a[1] in the next byte, etc, regardless of endian'ness. b will always be 0x01234567.

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I would use that only when endian is "correct", but I'm woried about strict aliasing. –  LightBit Dec 4 '12 at 17:48
1  
No, this is not the way to manufacture an uint32_t, it is undefined behavior because of alignment issues. It is never a good idea to cast to a type that might have a more restrictive alignment. The way to manufacture an uint32_t is the other way round, create a uint32_t and access its bytes through unsigned char. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 4 '12 at 19:33
2  
@JensGustedt Where this by reference I would concur, but the cast-promotion is not done by reference; it is done by value. I'm always willing to see a different side, however, so if you can cite a specific example where value-promotion like the above can (or even better, does) cause an alignment issue I'm very interested. Likewise, if there is something above that is specifically in violation of the standard (and thus UB) please note which subsection of the standard it violates. I've covered C99 6.3 and am aware of nothing that this violates, so if there is something else please share. –  WhozCraig Dec 4 '12 at 19:50
    
@JensGustedt The guys in chat suggested my phrasing in the first sentence was wrong, and that perhaps you thought I was agreeing with the OP on casting through an unsafe alias to get the uint32_t he was seeking. I was not suggesting his code was correct. Rather the exact opposite, so if there was confusion on that half I've slightly modded the initial sentence to make more clear the assessment. That said, if there is a UB problem the answer I'm definitely interested in knowing. –  WhozCraig Dec 4 '12 at 20:05
    
@WhozCraig, yes it is less ambigouous now, good. Still I don't think that you answer the question (but the OP does think so :). There are ways to obtain what the OP wants to achieve (view the bytes in memory order as integers). Only what he posted in his question is not the right answer, either. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 4 '12 at 20:19

I'd say the second example is also unsafe - it's just the case there that the compiler is not smart enough to find out that p and a actually point to the same (1-byte-aligned) location, and since void * cannot be aligned (by definition - what would be sizeof(void)?), it doesn't issue a warning.

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No, I think casting to void* tells the compiler not to expect anything about that pointer, so from a POV of aliasing this is ok. A much bigger problem is alignment. This is what makes the behavior undefined, here. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 4 '12 at 19:31
    
@JensGustedt Yes, I'm not telling anything else (at least I hope it's clear what I mean). –  user529758 Dec 4 '12 at 19:31
    
was not so clear to me. and in fact the compiler must be smart enough to see that he can't assume anything about *p. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 4 '12 at 19:36
    
@JensGustedt yes, that's what I mean by "void * cannot be aligned". –  user529758 Dec 4 '12 at 19:40

In both cases you are accessing your array elements (type uint8_t) by another type (uint32_t) which is not the signed variant of the original type nor is a character type.

C says you have to access an object by its own type or a signed variant or by a character type otherwise you are violating aliasing rules.

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