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Consider this basic recursion in python:

def fibonacci(number):
    if number == 0: return 0
    elif number == 1:
        return 1
    else:
        return fibonacci(number-1) + fibonacci(number-2)

which makes sense according to the (n-1) + (n-2) function of fibonacci series.

My question is how does Python execute recursion that contains another recursion not within but inside the same code line? does the 'finobacci(number-1)' completes all the recursion until it reaches '1' and then it does the same with 'fibonacci(number-2)' and add them?

for comparison the following recursive function for raising a number 'x' into power 'y', I can understand the recursion, def power calling itself until y==0 , since there's only one recursive call in a single line. Still shouldn't all results be '1' since the last command executed is 'return 1' when y==0, therefore x is not returned ?

def power(x, y):
    if y == 0:
        return 1
    else:
        return x*power(x, y-1)
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8 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In the expression fibonacci(number-1) + fibonacci(number-2) the first function call will have to complete before the second function call is invoked.

So, the whole recursion stack for the first call has to be complete before the second call is started.

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Short Answer

Each time python "sees" fibonacci() it makes another function call and doesn't progress further until it has finished that function call.

Example

So let's say it's evaluating fibonacci(4).

Once it gets to the line return fibonacci(number-1) + fibonacci(number-2), it "sees" the call fibonacci(number-1).

So now it runs fibonacci(3) - it hasn't seen fibonacci(number-2) at all yet. To run fibonacci(3), it must figure out fibonacci(2)+fibonacci(1). Again, it runs the first function it sees, which this time is fibonacci(2).

Now it finally hits a base case when fibonacci(2) is run. It evaluates fibonacci(1), which returns 1, then, for the first time, it can continue to the + fibonacci(number-2) part of a fibonacci() call. fibonacci(0) returns 0, which then lets fibonacci(2) return 1.

Now that fibonacci(3) has gotten the value returned from fibonacci(2), it can progress to evaluating fibonacci(number-2) (fibonacci(1)).

This process continues until everything has been evaluated and fibonacci(4) can return 3.

To see how the whole evaluation goes, follow the arrows in this diagram:

enter image description here

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does the 'finobacci(number-1)' completes all the recursion until it reaches '1' and then it does the same with 'fibonacci(number-2)' and add them?

Yes, that's exactly right. In other words, the following

return fibonacci(number-1) + fibonacci(number-2)

is equivalent to

f1 = fibonacci(number-1)
f2 = fibonacci(number-2)
return f1 + f2
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I would really recomment that u put your code in the python tutor http://www.pythontutor.com/

you will the be able to get it on the fly. see the stackframe, references....

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You can use the rcviz module to visualize recursions by simply adding a decorator to your recursive function.

https://github.com/carlsborg/rcviz

Heres the visualization for your code above:

output of OP's function with rcviz

The edges are numbered by the order in which they were traversed by the execution. The edges fade from black to grey to indicate order of traversal : black edges first, grey edges last.

(i wrote the rcviz module on github)

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You second recursion functions does this (example), so 1 will not be returned.

power(2, 3)

2 * power(2, 2)

2 * 2 * power(1,2)

2 * 2 * 2 * power(0,2) # reaching base case

2 * 2 * 2 * 1

8
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You can figure this out yourself, by putting a print function in the function, and adding a depth so we can print it out prettier:

def fibonacci(number, depth = 0):
    print " " * depth, number
    if number == 0:
        return 0
    elif number == 1:
        return 1
    else:
        return fibonacci(number-1, depth + 1) + fibonacci(number-2, depth + 1)

Calling fibonacci(5) gives us:

5
 4
  3
   2
    1
    0
   1
  2
   1
   0
 3
  2
   1
   0
  1

We can see that 5 calls 4, which goes to completion, and then it calls 3, which then goes to completion.

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Matthew and MArtjin are right but I thought I might elaborate:

Python does stuff from left to right whenever it can. Exceptions to this rule are implied by brackets.

in x*power(x, y-1): x is evaluated then power is evaluated

While in fibonacci(number-1) + fibonacci(number-2), fibonacci(number-1) is evaluated (recursively, til it stops) and then fibonacci(number-1) is evaluated

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