Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have code with the following structure:

template <typename T>
struct Foo
{
  struct Bar
  {
    int data;
  };
};

I want to write metafunctions which will tell me if a type is either Foo or Bar. The first one is easy:

template <typename T>
struct is_foo : boost::mpl::false_
{};

template <typename T>
struct is_foo<Foo<T> > : boost::mpl::true_
{};
...
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT(( is_foo<Foo<int> > ));
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT_NOT(( is_foo<int> ));

However, the same approach does not work for Bar:

template <typename T>
struct is_bar : boost::mpl::false_
{};

template <typename T>
struct is_bar<typename Foo<T>::Bar> : boost::mpl::true_
{};

This code is rejected by the compiler. GCC says:

main.cpp:38:8: error: template parameters not used in partial specialization:
main.cpp:38:8: error:         ‘T’

Oddly, clang will compile the code, but it issues a warning and the metafunction does not work (always false):

main.cpp:38:8: warning: class template partial specialization contains a template parameter that can not be deduced;
      this partial specialization will never be used
struct is_bar<typename Foo<T>::Bar> : boost::mpl::true_
       ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
main.cpp:37:20: note: non-deducible template parameter 'T'
template <typename T>
                   ^

Is there a workaround for this issue? A c++11-specific solution would be fine.

share|improve this question
5  
As Clang says, typename Foo<T>::Bar is a non-deducible context. It's the same as asking the compiler to enumerate all possible arguments to Foo and check if any Foo<U>::Bar matches the supplied T. Also, template<class T> void f(typename Foo<T>::bar){} is the same kind of non-deducible context, and you'd have to specify T manually to ever call this function. (Btw, this is how partial specialization of class templates is specified.) – Xeo Dec 4 '12 at 17:48
    
Thanks, your explanation makes sense. The problem now becomes to construct a workaround. – GRedner Dec 4 '12 at 19:23

Here's a hideously inelegant solution to my own question, using TTI (http://svn.boost.org/svn/boost/sandbox/tti):

First, add a dummy tag to Bar:

template <typename T>
struct Foo
{
  struct Bar
  {
    typedef void i_am_bar;
    int data;
  };
};

Next, use TTI to check for that tag:

BOOST_TTI_HAS_TYPE(i_am_bar);

template <typename T>
struct is_bar : boost::tti::has_type_i_am_bar<T>
{};
...
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT(( is_bar<Foo<int>::Bar> ));
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT_NOT(( is_bar<Foo<int> > ));
BOOST_MPL_ASSERT_NOT(( is_bar<int> ));

Yucky to be sure, but it satisfies my use-case.

share|improve this answer
    
You don't really need Boost.TTI for that, writing a trait that checks for the existence of that nested typedef is relatively easy (the has_element_type struct). Good job on finding a workaround, though. – Xeo Dec 5 '12 at 3:14

The problem is that T is part of the name of the type Foo<T>::Bar, but it's not part of the structure of the type.

A possible solution would be to encode T in the structure of the type:

template<typename Outer, typename Inner> struct Nested: public Inner {
  using Inner::Inner;
};
template<typename T> struct Foo {
  struct BarImpl {
    int data;
  };
  using Bar = Nested<Foo<T>, BarImpl>;
};

template <typename T> struct is_bar: std::false_type {};
template <typename T, typename U> struct is_bar<Nested<Foo<T>, U>>:
  std::is_same<typename Foo<T>::Bar, Nested<Foo<T>, U>> {};

Testing:

static_assert(is_bar<Foo<int>::Bar>::value, "!");
static_assert(!is_bar<Foo<int>>::value, "!");
static_assert(!is_bar<int>::value, "!");
share|improve this answer
    
This is clever - possibly too clever. I worry that anyone doing maintenance on this code (read: future me) will have trouble unraveling it. I have an alternate solution that uses boost::tti, but my reputation is to low for me to answer my own question within 8 hours of asking it. So you'll all have to wait until tonight :) – GRedner Dec 4 '12 at 19:26

compilers are correct, the simple and easy to understand explanation is: they just don't want to substitute all possible types T just to realise is there a nested type bar inside of given template. More precise explanation you may find in a 'classic' (and well known I hope) book about templates: "C++ Templates - The Complete Guide".

fortunately C++11 helps you to do it even better! :)

#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
struct has_nested_bar
{
    template <typename W>
    struct wrapper {};

    template <typename C>
    static std::true_type check(
        const wrapper<C>*
      , const typename C::Bar* = nullptr
      );

    template <class C>
    static std::false_type check(...);

    constexpr static bool value = std::is_same<
        decltype(check<T>(nullptr))
      , std::true_type
      >::type::value;
    typedef std::integral_constant<bool, value> type;
};

this metafucntion would check if a given type has nested Bar type (as far as I understant it was initial purpise of your is_bar).

template <typename T>
struct Foo
{
    struct Bar
    {
        int data;
    };
};

struct Bar {};

int main()
{
    std::cout << has_nested_bar<Foo<int>>::value << std::endl;
    std::cout << has_nested_bar<Bar>::value << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

will output:

zaufi@gentop /work/tests $ ./has-nested-bar
1
0

later you may combine this metafunction with your is_foo to check that nested Bar actually is inside of a Foo...

share|improve this answer
    
The purpose was to test whether a type is a nested Bar, not if it has one. – Xeo Dec 4 '12 at 20:45
    
@zaufi - thanks, but as Xeo says this isn't what I'm looking for. However, my "ugly" solution uses a utility of this type. – GRedner Dec 5 '12 at 2:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.