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I have php code that returns this from a database,

[
{
    "Time": "2012-11-27 16:10:35",
    "NumPlayers": "1"
},
{
    "Time": "2012-11-27 16:24:55",
    "NumPlayers": "1"
},
{
    "Time": "2012-11-27 16:25:37",
    "NumPlayers": "2"
},
{
    "Time": "2012-11-27 16:29:33",
    "NumPlayers": "2"

The times are MySQL timestamps. I need to get it into this format to use with Highcharts javascript charting.

data: [
[Date.UTC(1970,  9,  9), 0   ],
[Date.UTC(1970,  9, 14), 0.15],
[Date.UTC(1970, 10, 28), 0.35],
[Date.UTC(1970, 11, 12), 0.46],

I'm having trouble figuring out how to loop through the MySQL results and convert the timestamps to javascript Date.UTC objects. I need to place the NumPlayers value after the Date.UTC objects, and output it in the format below. I'm a PHP and javascript noob :\

It should look something like this:

data: [
[Date.UTC(2012, 11, 27, 16, 10, 35), 1],
[Date.UTC(2012, 11, 27, 16, 24, 55), 1],
[Date.UTC(2012, 11, 27, 16, 25, 37), 2],
[Date.UTC(2012, 11, 27, 16, 29, 33), 2],
share|improve this question
    
maybe moment.js is a solution momentjs.com ? –  Fietsband Dec 4 '12 at 17:49
    
you can parse your data and after build an simple array.. I cannot understand what you really want.. –  thiagoh Dec 4 '12 at 17:55
    
@GerardWesterhof It's usually better to do parsing on the server if you can get away with it, and in this case, the OP can. –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 19:10
    
Probably the best solution is parse on the backend, like @JuanMendes mentioned. –  Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann Dec 4 '12 at 20:08
    
@RicardoLohmann But don't do the parsing on your own as some have suggested –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 21:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should realize that Date.UTC(2012, 11, 27, 16, 10, 35) simply returns the number of milliseconds since the epoch (1356624635000). Therefore, you can just convert your object into UNIX timestamps (times a 1000 since JS works with millisecond timestamps, but PHP works with seconds).

Sample Code

$data = '[{"Time": "2012-11-27 16:10:35", "NumPlayers": "1"}, {"Time": "2012-11-27 16:24:55", "NumPlayers": "1"}]';

// Make sure date is parsed as UTC
date_default_timezone_set("UTC");

// Convert items into the desired format
$mapper = function($item) {
    return array(strtotime($item->Time)*1000, $item->NumPlayers);
}

echo json_encode(array_map($mapper, json_decode($data)));

Output

[[1354032635000,"1"],[1354033495000,"1"]]
share|improve this answer

You seem to be getting straight JSON from your database, which you can always convert into an array:

$data = '[{"Time": "2012-11-27 16:10:35", "NumPlayers": "1"}, {"Time": "2012-11-27 16:24:55", "NumPlayers": "1"}]';
$arrayData = json_decode($data, true);

After which you can simply iterate through the array and print out the contents of the array in the JS format you need. Something like that:

echo 'data: [' . PHP_EOL;
foreach ($arrayData as $item) {
    echo '[Date.UTC(';
    $tmp = preg_split( '/(-| |\:)/', $item['Time'] );
    echo implode(', ', $tmp);
    echo '), ' . $item['NumPlayers'] . '],';
    echo PHP_EOL;
}
echo PHP_EOL . '];';
share|improve this answer
    
The question is specifically about making them dates, json_decode isn't going to do that. You have to do it on the client since JSON doesn't support dates –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 17:58
    
@JuanMendes the output is the same as the OP wanted it codepad.org/DTlp0pr2 –  Havelock Dec 4 '12 at 18:25
    
Now that you added extra code to generate the JSON (which is not valid JSON) on your own, yes it will –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 18:27
    
@JuanMendes, which is added code "to generate the JSON"? –  Havelock Dec 4 '12 at 18:30
1  
I just submitted an answer that doesn't involve generating pseudo-JSON on your own. It sends properly formatted JSON over the wire (that is because Date.UTC just returns a number) –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 19:08

You can split the time string into sections using /[^\d]+/g:

var finalData = [], numbers=/[^\d]+/g, item, dateParts, newDate;
for (var i=0, l=data.length; i<l; i++) {
     item = data[i];
     dateParts = item.Time.split(numbers);
     newDate = Date.UTC.apply(Date, dateParts);
     finalData.push([newDate, item.NumPlayers]);
}

See also: MDN's documentation on JavaScript regular expressions (/[^\d]/g is a regex).

share|improve this answer
    
I prefer this approach of doing it on the client, so that proper JSON is sent over the wire, not JS as [Date.UTC(2012, 11, 27, 16, 10, 35), 1],. My only recommendation would be to have the server send a timestamp so the client doesn't need to parse the time –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 18:41
    
Except that you're splitting on the wrong thing, you need to split on the separators, not on the numbers. Also, your call to Date.apply is incorrect, it should be calling the UTC method. Notice your code is giving the wrong timestamps.jsfiddle.net/ck9bL But this one jsfiddle.net/ck9bL/3/works well. You should update the answer accordingly. –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 18:53
    
I provided a server side answer that doesn't require parsing on the server side and doesn't require generating JSON on your won. –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 19:09
    
@JuanMendes - Chuckles, yep, that's the exact opposite of what I wanted - I've updated my answer. Thanks for the catch! –  Sean Vieira Dec 4 '12 at 19:48
    
You should try your code... It still doesn't work, look at jsfiddle.net/ck9bL/3 for working code –  Juan Mendes Dec 4 '12 at 19:53

The best way to provide data to Highcharts is getting data formated from database, so that you don't have to do it on client side.

To do it you just have to change your query to something like the following.

Backend
$query = "SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP(date) * 1000 AS 'date', value FROM ...";

Then to send the result to frontend:
echo json_encode($result);

Frontend
To get the result on frontend, this case using jQuery and assuming that url is your url:

$.getJSON(url, function(json) {
    // decode json
    var data = $.parseJSON(json);
    // Then you just have to pass it to your series
});

Or better, store date values in UTC.

share|improve this answer
    
If the OP can do this, even better, no need to parse time strings –  Juan Mendes Dec 5 '12 at 0:20
    var php_data = [
        {
            "Time": "2012-11-27 16:10:35",
            "NumPlayers": "1"
        },
        {
            "Time": "2012-11-27 16:24:55",
            "NumPlayers": "1"
        }
    ];

    var length = php_data.length;
    hc_data = [];

    for(var i = 0; i< length; i++){
      php_date = new Date(php_data[i]["Time"]);
      hc_data.push(
        [
            Date.UTC(
                php_date.getFullYear(), 
                php_date.getMonth() + 1, 
                php_date.getDate()
            ),
            php_data[i]["NumPlayers"]
        ]
      );
    }

    // hc_data is your Array
share|improve this answer

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