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x = StandardError.new(:hello)
y = StandardError.new(:hello)
x == y # => true
x === y # => true

begin
  raise x
rescue x
  puts "ok" # gets printed
end

begin
  raise x
rescue y
  puts "ok" # doesn't get printed
end

Why isn't the second "ok" printed? I can't figure it out. I've read here that ruby uses the === operator to match exceptions to rescue clauses, but that's ostensibly not the case.

I'm using Ruby 1.9.3

EDIT: So it seems like that after doing raise x, x == y and x === y no longer hold. It seems to because x and y no longer have the same backtrace.

share|improve this question
    
No, that means "catch any StandardError and subclasses, and put the instance into the variable y". y is not interpreted as a value (as I want it to be), but as a variable name. –  Norswap Dec 4 '12 at 18:10
    
I think if you're trying to do pattern matches on RFID tags, the raise / catch idiom might not be the clearest way to go. What about a case statement or dynamic dispatch using patterns? –  Eric Walker Dec 4 '12 at 18:39
    
The application has some "low-level" logic which communicates with the card. This is where the exceptions are thrown. Above that is some higher level, applicative logic. Some of the errors returned by the tag are actually fairly high level (stuff like "the file already exists on the tag") and must bubble back up to the user. Exceptions seem the best option for this. –  Norswap Dec 4 '12 at 18:44
1  
Why not use an RFIDException class and attach whatever additional error info you need when you raise the exception raise RFIDException, "additional info". Then rescue this exception and apply whatever processing is needed in the rescue block. If you need to bubble the error upwards just reraise the same exception. You are "abusing" rescue mechanics by not rescuing an Exception class. I don't think it is specced for what you want to do. –  Casper Dec 4 '12 at 18:50
    
This would work if all exceptions needed to be handled in the same place. I would rescue RFIDException then do case exception.type or something like that and handle that. Unfortunately, different errors must be handled at different level in the call stack. –  Norswap Dec 4 '12 at 18:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I just want to add something to the table: OP code suggests that the two exceptions are the same but they are not - furthermore i want to illustrate what OP meant with:

So it seems like that after doing raise x, x == y and x === y no longer hold. It seems to because x and y no longer have the same backtrace.

 x = StandardError.new(:hello)
 y = StandardError.new(:hello)
 class Object
   def all_equals(o)
     ops = [:==, :===, :eql?, :equal?]
     Hash[ops.map(&:to_s).zip(ops.map {|s| send(s, o) })]
   end
 end

 puts x.all_equals y # => {"=="=>true, "==="=>true, "eql?"=>false, "equal?"=>false}

 begin
   raise x
 rescue
   puts "ok" # gets printed
 end

 puts x.all_equals y # => {"=="=>false, "==="=>false, "eql?"=>false, "equal?"=>false}
share|improve this answer

I think that's a bug, or rather an underspecification of Ruby 1.9. Note that Ruby 2.0 raises a

TypeError: class or module required for rescue clause

on lines 8 and 14.

Note that the raise doesn't necessarily do what you think it does, either. When you raise an object, you don't actually raise that object, you raise a new object which is constructed from the object you passed according to these simple rules:

  • if the object responds to exception, call exception on the object and raise the return value
  • if the object is a subclass of Exception, call new and raise the return value
  • otherwise fail
  • also fail if the return value of any of the above methods is not an instance of Exception

So, you are not actually raising x, you are raising x.exception. According to the documentation of Exception#exception x.exception is x, though.

share|improve this answer

It seems that the definition for rescue is:

[rescue [error_type [=> var],..]

Neither x nor y is stricly an error_type. They are instances of an error type. I don't think you're really running valid code the way you're doing it there.

If you run:

begin
  raise x
rescue y.class
  puts "ok"
end

Then it will work as expected.

Also note that on Ruby 1.8 neither x == y nor x === y returns true.

share|improve this answer
    
I will edit the question, I'm using ruby 1.9.3 –  Norswap Dec 4 '12 at 18:25
    
@Norswap But still; what exactly are you trying to do? I'm assuming you're just playing around, because what you are essentially doing is like saying rescue 1. It doesn't make any sense. You're supposed to rescue classes, not instances. –  Casper Dec 4 '12 at 18:27
    
@Casper: I think the code is valid (i.e., if it compiles, which it does). Whether it's clear is a different question. But I don't think that's relevant to the question. –  Eric Walker Dec 4 '12 at 18:28
    
I'm building an application around an RFID reader. When communicating with an RFID tag, some opcodes may be returned, indicating errors. I want to be able to "catch" particular errors; but without having to create a new Exception class for each error (which is burdensome). So my idea was to do "pattern-matching" with rescue: I want to catch Exceptions of some classes which satisfies some condition. The condition I'm after here is whether some field of the class has the value I wish. –  Norswap Dec 4 '12 at 18:31
    
The 1.9 pickaxe book says "For each rescue clause in the begin block, Ruby compares the raised exception against each of the parameters in turn. If the raised exception matches a parameter, Ruby executes the body of the rescue and stops looking. The match is made using parameter===$!". So I think the construction is valid. I've also put my finger on something. See edit in the question. So I guess the question is answered :/ Too bad for me. –  Norswap Dec 4 '12 at 18:54

EDIT: To clarify the issue for future responses, because I think my response is incorrect, the subtlety here is that x and y are instances rather than classes, and normally you would use classes in a raise statement.


If the intended behavior is to print at the second rescue, the y will not do the trick. You are raising an exception of class x, and you don't have a rescue clause that will handle x. You would see "ok" printed for the second block if you caught StandardError, the common base class, though:

begin
  raise x
rescue StandardError
  puts "ok"
end

Regarding #===, I think the issue is that when you raise, you're dealing with an instance of x rather than x as a class.

share|improve this answer
    
I know that, but it's not my question. My question is "why does rescue x catch x while rescue y does not?". You did not explain why rescue x catches x. Also you have a typo in your answer, since I don't "raise an exception of class x" (x is simply the variable holding the exception, which is of class StandardError). I'm not sure what you meant. –  Norswap Dec 4 '12 at 18:18
    
@Norswap: x is a variable holding a reference to a class. The thing that is caught is an instance of that class. –  Eric Walker Dec 4 '12 at 18:19
    
No it does not hold a reference to a class. x.class => StandardError. It is an instance of class StandardError. –  Norswap Dec 4 '12 at 18:21
    
@Norswap: you might be right -- I'll do some more reading. :) –  Eric Walker Dec 4 '12 at 18:23

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