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I have a lot of businesses services already implemented, and I´m exposing them as services by WCF.

I don´t like the idea to have one endpoint to each service..... it could be a problem to maintain in the future as my repository grows.......

I´d like to know wcf´s experts opinions if the code below would be a good approach an them I can move ahead with this solution.

Business Service A:

[ServiceContract]
public interface IServiceA
{
    [OperationContract]
    object AddA(object a);
    [OperationContract]
    object Update();
}

Business Service B:

[ServiceContract]
public interface IServiceB
{
    [OperationContract]
    object AddB(object b);
    [OperationContract]
    object Update();
}

Concrete implementation for Service A

public class ConcreteServiceA : IServiceA
{
    public object AddA(object a)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ConcreateServiceA::AddA");
        return null;
    }

    public object Update()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ConcreateServiceA::Update");
        return null;
    }
}

Concrete implementation for Service B

public class ConcreteServiceB : IServiceB
{
    public object AddB(object b)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ConcreateServiceB::AddB");
        return null;
    }

    public object Update()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ConcreateServiceB::Update");
        return null;
    }
}

My single service is partial to separate concerns to each service. Note that it´s constructors depends on both business services above, will be injection using IoC

Partial for constructors

public partial class WCFService
{
    IServiceA _a;
    IServiceB _b;
    public WCFService()
        : this(new ConcreteServiceA(), new ConcreteServiceB())
    {

    }
    public WCFService(IServiceA serviceA, IServiceB serviceB)
    {
        _a = serviceA;
        _b = serviceB;
    }
}

Partial class implementing only IServiveA

public partial class WCFService : IServiceA
{
    object IServiceB.AddB(object b)
    {
        return _b.AddB(b);
    }

    object IServiceB.Update()
    {
        return _b.Update();
    }

}

Partial class implementing only IServiceB

public partial class WCFService : IServiceB
{
    object IServiceA.AddA(object a)
    {
        return _a.AddA(a);
    }

    object IServiceA.Update()
    {
        return _a.Update();
    }
}

And in the client side, I using like that:

        var endPoint = new EndpointAddress("http://localhost/teste");
        ChannelFactory<IServiceA> _factoryA = new ChannelFactory<IServiceA>(new BasicHttpBinding(), endPoint);
        IServiceA serviceA = _factoryA.CreateChannel();
        serviceA.Update();

        var netTcpEndPoint = new EndpointAddress("net.tcp://localhost:9000/teste");
        ChannelFactory<IServiceB> _factoryB = new ChannelFactory<IServiceB>(new NetTcpBinding(), netTcpEndPoint);
        IServiceB serviceB = _factoryB.CreateChannel();
        serviceB.Update();

I really appreciate any opinion or other suggestions.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

There's nothing wrong with multiple endpoints - it's part of the process. What is wrong, however, is duplicating functionality over multiple endpoints. How many "UpdateThis's" or "AddThat's" developers need? This can get out of control and makes for a maintenance headache. Just look at your constructor, it will grow and grow as you add new services and consolidate them into one service.

Think coarse-grained not fine-grained.

As an alternative, maybe you can try passing request objects as a parameter and returning response objects. This approach may streamline your code and help you avoid the maintenance issues you mention in your post and gives you a suggestion.

So, it looks something like this:

// Your service will return a very generic Response object
public interface IService
    {
        Response YourRequest(Request request);
    }

// Your service implementation
public partial class WCFService : IService
    {
         Response IService.YourRequest(Request request)
         {
            //inspect the Request, do your work based on the values 
            //and return a response object               
         }
    }

// Your request object
public class Request()
    {
       object YourClass{get;set;}
       DoWhat Action{get;set;} //enum, constants, string etc.
       int ID {get; set;}
    }

 // Your response object
    public class Response()
        {
          bool Success {get; set;}
        }

// Create Request object
var request = new Request(){YourClass = YourClassName , Action DoWhat.Update(), ID=1};

// Your service call
var endPoint = new EndpointAddress("http://localhost/teste");
                ChannelFactory<IService> _factory = new ChannelFactory<IService>(new BasicHttpBinding(), endPoint);
                IService service = _factory.CreateChannel();
var response = service.YourRequest(request);

So, now you've removed the fine-grained approach and replaced it with course-grained one. Let me know if you'd like more detail.

share|improve this answer
    
You´re right when said 'Think coarse-grained not fine-grained', I´ll work one endpoint to each service. About your Request/Response classes suggestion its very nice, it would be possible use generics and delegates through WCF? For example: service.Request<IMyService>((x,y) => x.Add(y)) –  will Dec 4 '12 at 19:10
    
I don't see why not. Just follow the Request/Reponse pattern and you'll have way less maintenance. –  Big Daddy Dec 4 '12 at 19:15

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