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In django it's very common to use a local_settings.py file to supplement settings.py so that each machine can have different settings. Usually people do something like this.

try:
    from local_settings import *
except ImportError:
    print "No local settings found!"

But the settings file usually contains large lists such as INSTALLED_APPS. If I want to add an app, I'd rather not copy the entire list into local_settings.py and modify it (makes for less readable code, and updating settings.py no longer affects any machine that re-writes INSTALLED_APPS). So I figured I could do something like this:

try:
    f = open('local_settings.py','r')
    exec f.read()
except IOError:
    print "No local settings found!"

Now local_settings.py no longer has to rewrite the entire INSTALLED_APPS variable:

INSTALLED_APPS.append('debug_toolbar')

I was under the impression that anytime you're using exec or eval you're probably doing something wrong. So my question is, is there anything wrong with this and is there a better way to do it?

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1  
Your desire to have modifiable defaults does not preclude the use of import. Why do you think you need to use exec to accomplish this? –  cdhowie Dec 4 '12 at 18:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is my technique:

settings.py:

try:
    from local_settings import *
except ImportError:
    sys.exit("FATAL: No local settings file found.")

local_settings.py

import settings

settings.INSTALLED_APPS += ('django_extensions',)
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wouldn't this be a cyclical import? You can't import settings without importing local_settings without importing settings without... –  dustynachos Dec 4 '12 at 21:58
    
Works fine for me. It would take about 30 seconds to test... –  dgel Dec 4 '12 at 22:46
1  
I put the try statement at the bottom of settings.py so INSTALLED_APPS is already defined. That way you can also override settings (such as settings.DEBUG = True) –  dgel Dec 4 '12 at 22:51
    
I've used this technique on many production projects. –  dgel Dec 4 '12 at 22:53
    
I switched over to this method (before my last comment) so I know it works. I just didn't understand how this avoids the cyclical import problem. Your comment explains this nicely, thank you. Very fascinating. –  dustynachos Dec 4 '12 at 22:58

There is a much better way: import INSTALLED_APPS in local_settings.py, copy it, then add to the copy:

import settings

INSTALLED_APPS = settings.INSTALLED_APPS[:] + ['debug_toolbar']
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