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I have a WCF threading question that I haven't been able to find a good answer on. I have an implementation of IDispatchMessageInspector that has the following AfterReceiveRequest implementation:

public object AfterReceiveRequest(ref Message request, IClientChannel channel, InstanceContext instanceContext)
{
   return new SessionScope();
}

The constructor for SessionScope registers the current scope with a dictionary that basically tracks it by its thread. Then I have the following operation:

[MyServiceBehavior]
public class Service1 : IService1
{
   public string GetData(int value)
   {
      // Uses SessionScope.Current object for various things
   }
}

Will GetData be guaranteed to run on the same thread as the message inspector that inspected the WCF message previously? Likewise, would BeforeSendReply also be run on that same thread?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't guarantee that the request will remain on the same thread. IIS can (and will) pass it around between threads.

To achieve what you're going for you can load your object into the OperationContext.Current (or HttpContext.Current if you have aspCompatibilityMode turned on). I've done it by adding objects to the OperationContext.Extensions list:

First, your class has to implement IExtension

public sealed class SessionScope : IExtension<OperationContext> {
  // your class details here
}

You would then need to add your object to the OperationContext:

public object AfterReceiveRequest(ref Message request, IClientChannel channel, InstanceContext instanceContext)
{
   SessionScope scope = new SessionScope();
   OperationContext.Current.Extensions.Add( scope );
}

After that it will be available to you everywhere regardless of thread switching.

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Excellent! Exactly what I needed to know.. –  Mike Christensen Dec 4 '12 at 23:07

Assuming that you are running under IIS the answer is no.

IIS has a thing called "thread agility", which means that a single request can jump threads. We have several problems with this, in one case we got around this problem by using the http context.

Have a look at the answers to this question: Will a request in IIS run on a single thread?

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