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I want to take an IEnumerable<T> and split it up into fixed-sized chunks.

I have this, but it seems inelegant due to all the list creation/copying:

private static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, int partitionSize)
{
    List<T> partition = new List<T>(partitionSize);
    foreach (T item in items)
    {
        partition.Add(item);
        if (partition.Count == partitionSize)
        {
            yield return partition;
            partition = new List<T>(partitionSize);
        }
    }
    // Cope with items.Count % partitionSize != 0
    if (partition.Count > 0) yield return partition;
}

Is there something more idiomatic?

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marked as duplicate by Oliver, p.s.w.g, S.D., Eric Brown, Roman C Jul 25 '13 at 6:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Here is a similar question with a couple of different solutions on Stack already. –  Colin Pear Dec 4 '12 at 18:44
    

9 Answers 9

up vote 15 down vote accepted

You could try to implement Batch method mentioned above by your own like this:

    static class MyLinqExtensions 
    { 
        public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>( 
            this IEnumerable<T> source, int batchSize) 
        { 
            using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator()) 
                while (enumerator.MoveNext()) 
                    yield return YieldBatchElements(enumerator, batchSize - 1); 
        } 

        private static IEnumerable<T> YieldBatchElements<T>( 
            IEnumerator<T> source, int batchSize) 
        { 
            yield return source.Current; 
            for (int i = 0; i < batchSize && source.MoveNext(); i++) 
                yield return source.Current; 
        } 
    }

I've grabbed this code from http://blogs.msdn.com/b/pfxteam/archive/2012/11/16/plinq-and-int32-maxvalue.aspx. I think this approach has better performance that multiple collection enumeration using Skip/Take methods and it's lazy.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks very much like what I came up with. Upvoted. It looks like the code above requires that the Enumerator<T> tolerates MoveNext() being called twice in the end. When the source is exhausted (and the count isn't evenly divisible by batchSize), MoveNext() might be called once in the private helper method (where it returns false for the first time), and then once more in the public extension method. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 4 '12 at 20:46
    
This is nice. Thanks. –  Alastair Maw Dec 5 '12 at 10:30
    
Although people should read the comments in your link if they use this to avoid surprises if they iterate over the inside sequences multiple times, or with an .AsParallel() (which I'm not doing) –  Alastair Maw Dec 5 '12 at 10:47
    
There is a bug in your code, depending on how to use, certain elements are being pulled by source.Current. –  J. Lennon Mar 2 '13 at 1:14
    
It's buggy becouse too lazy :) –  arkhivania Jul 24 '13 at 11:22

Maybe?

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, int partitionSize)
{
    return items.Select((item, inx) => new { item, inx })
                .GroupBy(x => x.inx / partitionSize)
                .Select(g => g.Select(x => x.item));
}

There is an already implemented one too: morelinq's Batch.

share|improve this answer
    
I see that Batch basically does exactly what I do: code.google.com/p/morelinq/source/browse/MoreLinq/Batch.cs (only with an array internally instead of a list). –  Alastair Maw Dec 4 '12 at 18:57
    
+1 this one is great –  Roman Pekar Dec 5 '12 at 5:49
    
-1 as this one pulls everything into memory before returning any results and even then uses more memory by grouping things in a hashtable. –  Alastair Maw Nov 22 '13 at 20:11

For elegant solution, You can also have a look at MoreLinq.Batch.

It batches the source sequence into sized buckets.

Example:

int[] ints = new int[] {1,2,3,4,5,6};
var batches = ints.Batch(2); // batches -> [0] : 1,2 ; [1]:3,4 ; [2] :5,6
share|improve this answer
    
As noted in the other answer that mentions this, code.google.com/p/morelinq/source/browse/MoreLinq/Batch.cs does exactly what I do. OK. –  Alastair Maw Dec 4 '12 at 18:57
    
Yes you are right. Your code is elegant and does the same thing. I had not checked other links. I just uses this library, and thus specified here as an alternative. –  Tilak Dec 4 '12 at 19:08
    
I've accepted takemyoxygen's answer as I think it's more elegant for not having the intermediate list copying. –  Alastair Maw Dec 5 '12 at 10:38

Craziest solution (with Reactive Extensions):

public static IEnumerable<IList<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, int partitionSize)
{
    return items
            .ToObservable() // Converting sequence to observable sequence
            .Buffer(partitionSize) // Splitting it on spececified "partitions"
            .ToEnumerable(); // Converting it back to ordinary sequence
}

I know that I changed signature but anyway we all know that we'll have some fixed size collection as a chunk.

BTW if you will use iterator block do not forget to split your implementation into two methods to validate arguments eagerly!

share|improve this answer
public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, 
                                                       int partitionSize)
{
    int i = 0;
    return items.GroupBy(x => i++ / partitionSize).ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer
4  
That will evaluate all the items before returning a result, pulling everything into memory, which somewhat defeats the purpose of using IEnumerable<T>s. If I wanted to do that I'd just pass in a List<T> to start with and be done. –  Alastair Maw Dec 4 '12 at 18:56
1  
Is the .Select(x => x) actually necessary? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 4 '12 at 19:00
    
You need to evaluate the expression before you leave. Else it yields in wrong results –  nawfal Dec 6 '12 at 19:51

How about the partitioner classes in the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace?

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I'm being dumb, but the example given here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd381768.aspx seems truly enormous for such a simple task. How would this actually work in a way that's more elegant than what I already have? –  Alastair Maw Dec 5 '12 at 10:35

You can do this using an overload of Enumerable.GroupBy and taking advantage of integer division.

return items.Select((element, index) => new { Element = element, Index = index })
    .GroupBy(obj => obj.Index / partitionSize, (_, partition) => partition);
share|improve this answer
1  
it's good, but you have to write (_, partition) => partition.Select(x => x.element) instead of (_, partition) => partition –  Roman Pekar Dec 5 '12 at 6:10
    
This is rather inefficient - it has to pull the whole IEnumerable<T> into memory (assuming it's of finite length to begin with), and will probably use a rather wasteful hashtable to do the grouping. –  Alastair Maw Nov 22 '13 at 20:09

It feels like you want two iterator blocks ("yield return methods"). I wrote this:

static class Extensions
{
  public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Partition<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, int partitionSize)
  {
    retutn new PartitionHelper<T>(items, partitionSize);
  }

  private sealed class PartitionHelper<T> : IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>
  {
    readonly IEnumerable<T> items;
    readonly int partitionSize;
    bool hasMoreItems;

    internal PartitionHelper(IEnumerable<T> i, int ps)
    {
      items = i;
      partitionSize = ps;
    }

    public IEnumerator<IEnumerable<T>> GetEnumerator()
    {
      using (var enumerator = items.GetEnumerator())
      {
        hasMoreItems = enumerator.MoveNext();
        while (hasMoreItems)
          yield return GetNextBatch(enumerator).ToList();
      }
    }

    IEnumerable<T> GetNextBatch(IEnumerator<T> enumerator)
    {
      for (int i = 0; i < partitionSize; ++i)
      {
        yield return enumerator.Current;
        hasMoreItems = enumerator.MoveNext();
        if (!hasMoreItems)
          yield break;
      }
    }

    Enumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
      return GetEnumerator();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's exactly it, although takemyoxygen's answer is a little more concise so I've accepted that one, despite your proviso about multiple calls to MoveNext(). (I think most enumerators are quite happy with that, surely?) –  Alastair Maw Dec 5 '12 at 10:41

Some simple one.

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source, int batchSize)
    {
        int currentSkip = 0;
        while (source.Skip(currentSkip).Take(batchSize).Count() > 0)
        {
            yield return source.Skip(currentSkip).Take(batchSize);
            currentSkip += batchSize;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a Shlemiel the painter's algorithm, so it's not very efficient, especially if your source requires a lot of work to build. –  Rawling Jul 24 '13 at 11:46

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