Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a very simple generic constructor method:

public T Instance<T, TT>(TT parms) where T : class
{
    return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), new[] { parms });
}

When I call the method like:

Instance<MyClass, string>("SomeStringValue").Customers.Where(x => x.Id == Id).Select(p => blah..blah...blah;

I get a 'System.MissingMethodException: Constructor on type 'MyClass' not found. at System.RuntimeType.CreateInstanceImpl(BindingFlags bindingAttr, Binder binder, Object[] args, CultureInfo culture...'

I have tried adding bindingflags etc. but without any luck.

I am basically trying to instantiate an object with arguments. I can without any problems explicitly declare the object:

var myObj = new MyClass("SomeStringValue");

But I need to make use of my generic constructor.

Can anyone clarify what I am missing?

EDIT A complete program (simplified).

public abstract class A 
{
    public T Instance<T, TT>(TT parms) where T : class
    {
       return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), new[] { parms });
    }
}

public class B 
{
    public B(string someValue)
    {
        var myValue = someValue;
    }
}

public class C
{
  public void DoStuff()
  {
     var x = Instance<B, string>("SomeStringValue");
  }
}

Is what I am trying to do.

share|improve this question
3  
Is the constructor public? A short but complete program demonstrating the problem would make this easier to help you with. –  Jon Skeet Dec 4 '12 at 18:59
    
Your Instance method will not compile. params is a keyword. –  asawyer Dec 4 '12 at 19:05
    
Yes the constructor is public. Sorry param is actually parm. I will edit it right away. –  codingjoe Dec 4 '12 at 20:09
    
Can you check which overload of the CreateInstance method is invoked? Note that CreateInstance(Type, params object[]) is declared with the params keyword: Therefore, I suppose that the compiler thinks that your TT[] is the first parameter, so it's looking for a constructor of B that takes a string[] rather than one string. –  O. R. Mapper Dec 4 '12 at 20:27
    
It is actually working now...just needed to add object[]. return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), new object[] { parms }); Is that the way to do it? I was hoping to make use of my TT and actually avoid using object. –  codingjoe Dec 4 '12 at 20:34
show 1 more comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The Activator<T>.CreateInstance() overload you're trying to call expects a second argument of type Object[]. The new array you are creating is a TT[]. If TT were constrained to a class type, then a TT[] might satisfy the Object[] parameter. An unconstrained generic TT[], however, cannot be used as an Object[]. Once the compiler determines that the TT[] cannot be passed as an Object[], it then (because of the params specification on the second parameter of the overload), it checks whether the second parameter you're passing qualifies as an Object. Because all arrays derive from Object, it will. The compiler will thus create a single-element array of type Object which holds the TT[] that you were trying to pass in. Since there is no constructor that expects an Object[], the call will fail.

If you want to prevent this problem, create a new Object[] containing the appropriate parameters, instead of creating a new TT[]. That should solve your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. Thanks for the detailed explanation. O.R. Mapper did also mention to use object[]. Silly me! I was looking in the wrong direction. –  codingjoe Dec 4 '12 at 20:44
add comment

Change the constructor of class B as shown below:

public B(object someValue)
    {
        var myValue = someValue;
    }

and your code will start working properly.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't that bad? I am trying to be more restrictive in my approach and be more typesafe instead of opening up for everything. Please I welcome any opinion on my concern. –  codingjoe Dec 4 '12 at 20:47
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.