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I'm using format to create readable flat tables for which ftable is not sufficient. The one caveat is that in calculating column frequencies using the prop.table function, NA values are printed as NA when this causes clutter and low readability.

How can I modify code like the following to print NA or NaN values using blank space or a period? I considered using the sub function, but I believe it's messy and prone to errors if column names contain those character values.

x <- sample(c(1, 2, 3), 100, replace=TRUE)
y <- sample(factor(c(1, 2), levels=1:3), 100, replace=TRUE)
t <- table(x,y)
p <- prop.table(t, margin=2)
o <- structure(
  paste(format(t), '(', format(round(100*p)), '%)'),
  dim=dim(t),
  dimnames=dimnames(t)
)

This is the example output given:

> o
   y
x   1             2             3            
  1 "20 (  38 %)" "21 (  44 %)" " 0 ( NaN %)"
  2 "20 (  38 %)" "16 (  33 %)" " 0 ( NaN %)"
  3 "12 (  23 %)" "11 (  23 %)" " 0 ( NaN %)"
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2 Answers 2

x <- sample(c(1, 2, 3), 100, replace=TRUE)
 y <- sample(factor(c(1, 2), levels=1:3), 100, replace=TRUE)
 t <- table(x,y)
 p <- prop.table(t, margin=2)
 p <- round(100*p,digits=0)
 p[is.na(p) ] <- " "
 o <- structure(
    paste(format(t), '(', format(p), '%)'),
    dim=dim(t),
    dimnames=dimnames(t)
  )
 o
#-------------------------
   y
x   1            2            3           
  1 "17 ( 34 %)" "14 ( 28 %)" " 0 (    %)"
  2 "15 ( 30 %)" "17 ( 34 %)" " 0 (    %)"
  3 "18 ( 36 %)" "19 ( 38 %)" " 0 (    %)"

Replace the blank (" ") with any string you want.

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One easy way would be to parse through rows and columns (if your data isn't big):

no_row=nrow(o)
no_col=ncol(o)

for(rows in 1:no_row){
  for(cols in 1:no_col){
    o[rows,cols]<-sub(pattern = "NaN", replacement = "0",  x = o[rows,cols])
    }
}

But of course there are simple better ways to do it. :) Above code output is:

> o
   y
x   1             2             3          
  1 "17 (  31 %)" "13 (  29 %)" " 0 ( 0 %)"
  2 "16 (  29 %)" "21 (  47 %)" " 0 ( 0 %)"
  3 "22 (  40 %)" "11 (  24 %)" " 0 ( 0 %)"

Hope it will help!

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