Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to parallelize my application using OpenMP (and C) and wanted to start with the I/O part. Initially the reading and the computational part are sequentials and take around 3 seconds each.

int *mask, width, height
Picture *pic;

pic = readFile("some big file");   // 3 secs
mask = computeMask(width, height); // 3 secs

With OpenMP:

#pragma parallel default(none) shared(pic, mask, width, height)
{
 #pragma sections
 {
  #pragma section
  {
   pic = readFile("some big file");
  }
  #pragma section
  {
   mask = computeMask(width, height);
  }
 }
}

But now the overall time is around 10 seconds (and is really spent in the I/O task).

Before I'm starting blaming the concurrent access on the RAM to create that bottleneck. I'd love to know if there is something I got wrong here.

share|improve this question
1  
OpenMP sections execute concurrently, e.g. computeMask would execute while readFile is reading the file. If computeMask uses data that readFile pumps, then it would both produce incorrect results (it might access data that still hasn't been read) or (false) sharing would lead to vastly increased cache miss rate. I/O is usually as fast as it can be (bandwidth-limited operation) and the only way to make it faster is to run on a (distributed) system with many I/O controllers. –  Hristo Iliev Dec 4 '12 at 21:18
    
@HristoIliev the two sections can be executed concurrently as they are not sharing any data with each other. readFile pumps some data from the disk into memory while computeMask fills another memory area. The final operation uses both of them to compute the destination picture. –  greut Dec 5 '12 at 9:00
1  
I see. Then you might be also limited by the memory bandwidth. Is readFile doing some processing (e.g. decompression) on the content of the file or is it just binary reading it into memory? If latter, then you might try memory mapping instead to have the data read on demand from the disk. –  Hristo Iliev Dec 5 '12 at 9:09
1  
malloc used to be locking years ago. This is no longer the case - glibc uses an almost lockless malloc implementation. And you do not need to synchronise mmap invocations (what you have linked to talks about mmap in the context of malloc, since malloc uses it for large allocations). –  Hristo Iliev Dec 5 '12 at 17:07
1  
You're my new bible! :-) With mmap, the readFile operation is now almost instantaneous. Marvellous! Many thanks. –  greut Dec 5 '12 at 20:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.