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I have a method that takes a generic parameter type. The scenario I have is this method will be called with different parameter types.

class something{
    public void someMethod(){
        List<A> listA = ....; //Class A have a field String Id;
        List<B> listB = ....; //Class B haave a field String Id;

        testMethod(listA);
        testMethod(listB);
    }

    private <T> void testMethod( List<T> list ){
            for( T event : list ){
                //TODO (something like): event.getId();
            }
        }
}

In the above code all the parameters will be be a List<someObjectType>. All the object types have a common field and need to use the getter to fetch its value. Now since the method definition is generic, how do I achieve this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Have A and B implement a common interface that has a method getID:

interface SomeInterface {
    String getID();
}

then you could have:

private <T extends SomeInterface> void testMethod(List<T> list) {
    for (T event : list) {
        // now you can use `event.getID()` here
    }
}
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1  
Awesome it works, exactly what i was expecting. this avoids the multiple type casts which is necessary otherwise. Thanks a ton. –  broun Dec 4 '12 at 20:20

There is no point in creating such a generic method without bounded type. Since T isn't bounded to any type, you can't use specific interface on the objects inside the list. So if you want testMethod to get list of objects of any type, you should use List<?> instead.

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This cannot be done. You can't handle two different lists with incompatible interfaces the same way in your method, unless you do something with instanceof, i.e.

public void testMethod(List<? extends Object> list) {
  if(list.get(0) == null) return;
  if(list.get(0) instanceof A) {
    // Do the A stuff
  } else {
    // Do the B stuff
  }
}
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Thanks for the response, but I think having a common interface works better which avoids the typecast. –  broun Dec 4 '12 at 20:21
    
@Vijay it works better in some situations, but not others where it's inappropriate. I'm glad that it works in your situation. –  durron597 Dec 4 '12 at 20:23

Define your method like this with T extending your common class/interface BaseType:

private <T extends BaseType> void testMethod( List<T> list ){
   for( T event : list ){
       //TODO (something like): event.getId();
   }
}

Example:

public void someMethod() {
    List<Integer> listA = Arrays.asList( new Integer[] {1, 4, 9} );
    List<Double> listB = Arrays.asList( new Double[] {1.5, 4.2, 9.3} );;
    testMethod(listA);
    testMethod(listB);
}

private <T extends Number> void testMethod( List<T> list ){
    for( T event : list ) {
        // Note intValue() method is being called here which is provided
        // in the base class Number that is being extended by T
        System.out.println(event.intValue());
    }
}   
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As other answers said, you need to bound the type parameter by some interface. But for what you're using it for, you don't actually need to have a T:

private void testMethod(List<? extends SomeInterface> list) {
    for (SomeInterface event : list) {
        // now you can use `event.getID()` here
    }
}
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I don't know if i really understand what you want. But if you know, you will store for example Strings into your List and want to use the toUpperCase() method, how about just casting it?

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Since the method will be called multiple times each time with different type of parameter, type casting doesnt seem scalable (and i feel its suboptimal) since i have do include 20 typecasts if i call with 20 different parameter types. –  broun Dec 4 '12 at 20:10

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