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I have a question about Preprocessor directives in C and C++.

I have the following code:

#ifdef __cplusplus
//part A
extern "C" 
{
// somecode here
}
#else
//part B
#endif

I know the c++ complier predefined the __cplusplus will c compiler does not.

And I put this set of code into a c header file, and c++ file will include this c header file. And my question is: if the file is compiled by a c++ compiler, it will compile the part A, and if it is compiled by a c compiler, it will compile the part B, but normally, we use this code to make c++ file and c file interact with each other, if we have such code above, I mean we have both C and C++ file together, and we use gcc compiler, how this code is compiled? only part A is compiled? or only part B is compiled? or the code is devided into two parts, part A is compiled for C++ and part B is compiled for C file at the same time?

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You could just try it? –  djechlin Dec 4 '12 at 20:26
    
how? I could try it, but I still need some details about how it works to prove the result I got, right? –  user707549 Dec 4 '12 at 20:27
    
usually compilers have the option to only preprocess code. you can then look at the header after preprocessing. See also: gcc -E –  Alex Dec 4 '12 at 22:42
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In a project with multiple source files, the header is not processed just once by the compiler.

When the compiler compiles a C++ file, it reads that file and any headers it includes (directly or indirectly) and processes the contents of those files using the rules for C++.

When the compiler compiles a C file, it reads that file and any headers it includes (directly or indirectly) and processes the contents of those files using the rules for C.

The result will be as if the code in your header file appeared separately in the C++ source and in the C source.

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ok, thank you for your explaination, but if the _cplusplus is predefined in c++ compiler, and we are using gcc, does this mean even the compiler compiles a C file, since the __cplusplus is predefined, so the part B will not in the C source, instead, part A will be in the C source? –  user707549 Dec 4 '12 at 21:00
    
“The compiler” is not just a fixed program capable of doing only one thing. When you tell it to compile a C++ program, it acts as a C++ compiler, and it defines _cplusplus. When you tell it to compile a C program, it acts as a C compiler, and it does not define _cplusplus. –  Eric Postpischil Dec 4 '12 at 21:04
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if we have such code above, I mean we have both C and C++ file together, and we use gcc compiler, how this code is compiled? only part A is compiled? or only part B is compiled?

That depends on how the translation unit that #includes the header is being compiled. If it's being compiled as C++, then part A will take effect; if it's being compiled as C, it will be part B.

With gcc, the language is either determined by the file extension, or can be explicitly specified on the command line:

-x language

Specify explicitly the language for the following input files (rather than letting the compiler choose a default based on the file name suffix). This option applies to all following input files until the next -x option.

Possible values for language are: c c-header c-cpp-output c++ c++-header c++-cpp-output objective-c objective-c-header objective-c-cpp-output objective-c++ objective-c++-header objective-c++-cpp-output assembler assembler-with-cpp ada f77 f77-cpp-input f95 f95-cpp-input java

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I mean if we have both c and c++ in the project, and these Preprocessor directives is defined in a c header file, and this header file is included in a c++ file, and we compile the whole project using gcc, which part will be compiled? –  user707549 Dec 4 '12 at 20:31
    
If it's included in a C++ file, it will be part A. –  NPE Dec 4 '12 at 20:32
    
yes, it is included in a C++ file, and also that header is included in a C file as well, and these files are in the same project, and we compiled the whole project, which part will be compiled? –  user707549 Dec 4 '12 at 20:35
    
When it's included from the C++ file, it will be part A. When it's included from the C file, it will be part B. If you have any doubt, you could always run the C/C++ files through the preprocessor (-E flag to gcc) and examine the output. –  NPE Dec 4 '12 at 20:36
    
ok, it is included in both C++ and C file, does this mean part A will be compiled for C++ file and part B will be compiled for C file at the same time? and does this mean C++ file can not see the variable defined in part B? –  user707549 Dec 4 '12 at 20:38
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Direct answer: only the part appropriate to the current compiler invocation is compiled.

Typically the structure is

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
/* Definitions here */
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

in the header file. So you get compatible definitions in both languages. The implementation file would then be pure C and stored in a .c file.

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hello, I know this structure of this code, but the code I wrote above is existing code, we do not want to change it. –  user707549 Dec 4 '12 at 20:33
    
Hard to say without seeing the actual code, but if the original author has two distinct implementations in the file, it sounds poor for maintenance. –  DrC Dec 4 '12 at 20:38
    
yes, that is why I need to keep the same structure. –  user707549 Dec 4 '12 at 20:39
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By default gcc will recognize .C, .cpp, .cc and a few other extensions as C++ and .c as C. You could try funkier things in your make file to force it through each way but in the simple case, it's this simple.

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Conceptually C++ is converted into C code by mangling identifiers. This will effect the linking. (in fact this was how it was done in the past and if memory serves me right it was done by CFront.

So having

#ifdef __cplusplus
   extern "C" {
#endif
   /* Definitions here */
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

You have the same definitions for both C and C++. You do not want different ones (Part A & B in your question) as that is silly. You just what the same if you use it for C and C++.

The extern "C" bit tells the C++ compiler to ensure that the linking is for object code compiled for C - therefore do not do the C++ magic and thus ensure that the linking will work.

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