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I was curious if there were any best practices to indexing the metrics od a collections that is aggregated by month/day.

Document example:

{
  track: {
    2012: { # year
      1: { # month
        page_views: ...,
        clicks: ...,
        visits: ...
      },
      5: {
        page_views: ...,
        clicks: ...,
        visits: ...
      },
      ...
  }
}

Edit:

Since theres a discusion going on about how the document can be improved and a few suggestions to split it out (which I've considered). I'll update why the requirements are the way they are. The document is for tracking a user. Tracking their pageviews, visits, etc over time. The user has other data on the document. For for example theres a registeration_date. The goal was to be able to say something like "show me users who registered on X date and have more then Z page views between A and B tracking dates". I haven't been able to come up with a schema without embedding that would facilitate this.

Updated Document example:

{
  registration_date: ...,
  email: ...,
  track: {
    2012: { # year
      1: { # month
        page_views: ...,
        clicks: ...,
        visits: ...
      },
      5: {
        page_views: ...,
        clicks: ...,
        visits: ...
      },
      ...
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
The best indexing strategy depends on what your most frequent and most performance-critical queries are. –  Philipp Dec 4 '12 at 20:57
    
I'll be querying most of the metrics. It just seems crazy to create an index for every possible date.month and have to update that index every time a new month is created. If you put an index on all of "track" would all the metrics get the index benefit? –  CrashRoX Dec 4 '12 at 21:21
    
Updating the index as you are thinking of is not a sound way of doing this, that is, if the index even works. Hmm sounds like you need to rethink your schema, not all of it is here but I would say you are thinking too normalised for your scenario –  Sammaye Dec 4 '12 at 21:25
    
This document has great explanation about indexing in MongoDB. It could help you. calv.info/indexing-schemaless-documents-in-mongo –  parvin Dec 5 '12 at 7:28

3 Answers 3

Unfortunately your database schema is very indexing-unfriendly. When you nest objects like that, your only option is to create an index on every possible year/month combination. It is also very hard to query. When you want to get, just for example, the best three months in descending order, you will have a hard time trying to do that on the database.

A better option would be to put both year and month into the objects, put the objects in an array (because indexes can be used for array lookup), and create an unique compound index over year, month and an unique field of the surrounding document.

{
    name: "Some Unique Name",
    tracking:    [
        {year: 2011, month: 11, page_views: 235, clicks: 132, visits: 87 },
        {year: 2011, month: 12, page_views: 176, clicks: 122, visits: 67 },
        {year: 2012, month: 1, page_views: 53, clicks: 32, visits: 17 },
        {year: 2012, month: 2, page_views: 89, clicks: 72, visits: 67 },
        {year: 2012, month: 3, page_views: 99, clicks: 82, visits: 72 }
    ]
}

ensureIndex({name:1, tracking.year:1, tracking.month:1});

When you need frequent access to the accumulated statistics of individual days, months or years, you could store these metrics in individual sub-documents:

    tracking_daily: [
        ...
        {year: 2012, month: 3, day: 1, ...  }, 
        {year: 2012, month: 3, day: 2, ...  }, 
        {year: 2012, month: 3, day: 3, ...  }, 
        {year: 2012, month: 3, day: 4, ...  }, 
        {year: 2012, month: 3, day: 5, ...  }, 
        {year: 2012, month: 3, day: 6, ...  }, 
        {year: 2012, month: 3, day: 7, ...  }, 
        {year: 2012, month: 3, day: 8, ...  }, 
        ...
    ],
    tracking_monthly: [
        ...
        {year: 2011, month: 11, ... },
        {year: 2011, month: 12, ... },
        {year: 2012, month: 1, ...  },
        {year: 2012, month: 2, ...  },
        {year: 2012, month: 3, ...  } 
        ...
    ],
    tracking_yearly:    [
        ...
        {year: 2011, ...  },
        {year: 2012, ...  }
    ]
share|improve this answer
    
Do you suggest using a timestamp instead of year and month? Will that make any difference for the index and the space usage? –  CrashRoX Dec 4 '12 at 22:19
    
The Timestamp BSON data type is only for internal use by MongoDB. Users should use Date instead (which also includes the time) or their own timestamp convention. Considering that MongoDB doesn't compress field names (when you have 1000 objects with a field "month", it stores at least 1000 instances of the string "month") it might not be a bad idea to put the full date information in one field. –  Philipp Dec 5 '12 at 9:46
    
Regarding performance of a one-field index vs. a compound-field index: I don't think that there is much of a difference (as long as you use the full compound index), but when there is one, then a single-field index will most likely perform better. –  Philipp Dec 5 '12 at 9:50

Having thought about this some more I may suggest a schema.

I personally would not use subdocuments for the metrics at all, since I can imagine there will be date queries over a metric timespan.

You have also got to consider that ripping out metrics from subdocuments, particularly a subdocument that, in years, could easily result in huge processing for the client side, would require the aggregation framework at least; even then I am unsure if it could do true analytical queries in a fast enough time for you to be happy.

Another reason for omitting subdocuments is future compatibility with the size of the root document. I touched this a little in the previous paragraph by stating that over time the subdocuments could become sizeable.

So generally for future compatibility and speed of querying I would not use subdocuments extensively.

Normally a good way, as found from my own personal experience and many discussions on such schemas is to actually split your tracking distribution into time bucket collections, as such you will have a collection per daily, monthly and yearly statistics; creating a total of 3 collections.

I would also personally for a relatively flat document to ensure linear range queries across well optimised indexes in this case, however nesting is not always a bad idea. Let me give you an example of a document that could be used for daily statistics:

{
    hours: [
        {views: 2, unique: 1} // This is actually index 0 which denotes hour 0 of the day
    ],
    pageviews: 1000,
    unique_visitors: 4,
    visitors: 67,
    clicks: 5
}

You will see how, for ease of querying, I have placed the hours of the day into a subdocument. This means that to query for that days statistics I only have to make one round trip however I lose no real analytics abilities since it would be very unlikely I wish to use the hours subdocument from two days in a complex query.

So yea I would personally take heed of my comment and try to denormalise your data a little. You are thinking too normalised with MongoDB atm.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually the path I wanted to originally go down. The issue is that there's some other data that I'd like to query against. The document is for a user. Tracking their pageviews, visits, etc over time. The user has other data on the document. For for example theres a registeration_date. The goal was to be able to say "show me users who registered between X and Y dates and have more then Z page views between A and B dates". I haven't been able to come up with a schema without embedding that would facilitate this. –  CrashRoX Dec 4 '12 at 22:05
    
@CrashRoX in this case I would probably duplicate the registration date over to the stats or whnat you can do is get a list of user_ids that satisfy your criteria and then search the statistics for them –  Sammaye Dec 5 '12 at 8:10

Are you sure its really worth it to aggregate the tracking data at all on user level? How about just dealing with timestamps like this:

{
 userId: 1234,
 registered: ISODate(""),
 visits: [ 
   ISODate(""), 
   ISODate(""),
   ISODate("")
 ],
 clicks: [
   ISODate(""),
   ISODate("")
 ]
}

Then just the aggregation framework to match by registration date and e.g. count the number of visits.

In case you can afford to do an additional lookup on the users collection, it would be even better to store the tracking data on object basis instead:

visits_collection
{
  {userId: 1234, time: ISODate(""), registration: ISODate("")},
  {userId: 1234, time: ISODate(""), registration: ISODate("")},
  {userId: 1234, time: ISODate(""), registration: ISODate("")},
}

For querying again use the aggregation framework. This could also be a capped collection and have an index on the registration field if you like. Its also more flexbile as you can add more fields such as visit duration later.

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