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I have this loop

for(int i=0;i<vec1.size();++i)
{
    if(vec1[i]==*p)
    {
        vec1[i]=*p;
        cout<<"element updated"<<endl;
    }
    else
    {
        cout<<"push_back"<<endl;
        vec1.push_back(*p);
    }
}

I'm inserting objects in container class and I've overloaded the == to check two parameters inside the object and if they match I want to update the them and if they don't match I want to put them in the vector, but I don't seem to be able to properly populate my vector, when I do vec1.size() I get 0 even when I insert 3 objects.

share|improve this question
    
So you are confirming that your push_backs are being called? I assume you have hard-coded some push_backs to verify the 3 insertions you cite? –  RonaldBarzell Dec 4 '12 at 21:39
    
what is p pointing to? I assume it's a pointer. –  Gustavo Litovsky Dec 4 '12 at 21:40
    
if(vec1[i]==*p) vec1[i]=*p; is pointless. You are checking to see if the item at vec[i] is equal to p and if it is, then you set it to p. You set it to the same value you just confirmed it to be. Is this what you intended to do? –  John Dibling Dec 4 '12 at 21:43
    
@John Dibling: The question explicitly says that operator== is overloaded to look at two specific fields. I take that to mean there are others that could meaningfully be updated. I won't call it a good design, but it's not a no-op as you say. –  Novelocrat Dec 4 '12 at 21:46
    
Don't push new elements into vector when you are iterating over it.. –  the.malkolm Dec 4 '12 at 21:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're problem is that your if is inside your search loop. Your if will never be executed, because your loop body never runs, because your .size() will never be greater than 0.

Try this:

// UNTESTED
std::vector<person> vec1;
add(person *p) {
  std::vector<person>::iterator it = std::find(vec1.begin(), vec1.end(), *p);
  if(it == vec1.end())
    vec1.push_back(*p);
  else
    *it = *p;
}

Or, if you really want to code the loop by hand:

// UNTESTED
std::vector<person> vec1;
add(person *p) {
  int i;
  for(i=0;i<vec1.size();++i) {
    if(vec1[i] == *p)
      break;
  }
  if(i == vec1.size())
    vec1.push_back(*p);
  else
    vec1[i] = *p;
}

Of course, you might consider changing your container. Using a std::map would shorten your code and reduce the time it takes to manipulate large data sets.

std::map<std::string, person> map1;
add(person *p) {
  map1[p->name] = *p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you really intended to invoke vec[i] = *p for its non-obvious side effects, then my code above must be modified. Leave a comment and I'll update it, if that is what you meant. –  Robᵩ Dec 4 '12 at 21:48
    
Yeah, the reason I want to invoke 'vec[i]=*p' is because I want to update the elements inside say I have 'person p1("tom")' and then person 'p2("tom" "32323")' and i have 'c.add(&p1)' 'c.add(&p2)' i want only the 2nd one to remain inside the vector –  user1871268 Dec 4 '12 at 22:00
    
Okay. I've updated my answer. –  Robᵩ Dec 4 '12 at 22:07
    
I think you misunderstood me there, I need to populate a vector with objects, and if an objects happens to have the same attributes(vec1[i]==p*) then i execute vec1[i]=*p, if it doesn't find any object with same attributes I just add it to the vector –  user1871268 Dec 4 '12 at 22:23
    
I think that is exactly what my code does. My code inserts or updates one object into your vector. My code would live inside .add(); you would invoke my code once for each time you wanted to add a person. –  Robᵩ Dec 4 '12 at 22:30

When the vec1 starts from empty, the for loop is not going to run. So you want to have at least one element in vec1 to start with. How about add this:

vec1.push_back(*p);
for(int i=0;i<vec1.size();++i){//the rest}
share|improve this answer
    
The issue with this is that it will invoke vec1.push_back(*p) every time i call the member function –  user1871268 Dec 4 '12 at 22:06
    
How about this: if(vec1.empty()) vec1.push_back(*p); –  cpp initiator Dec 4 '12 at 22:07

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