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I am writing a blog where I upload text documents to a directory that contain HTML. Using the code below, do you anticipate I will have any issues with file locking or other problems I am not seeing? I am most concerned about the File.ReadAllText().

The directory will contain a list of files ex:

20120101_2300.txt

20120201_0100.txt

etc...

public class Website
{
    private string directory = "C:\\Web";
    public List<BlogEntry> GetArchives()
    {
        return GetArchives("");
    }

    public List<BlogEntry> GetArchives(string date)
    {
        var files = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(date) ? Directory.GetFiles(directory, "*.txt").Where(t => t.Contains(date)) : Directory.GetFiles("C:\\Web", "*.txt");
        var sb = files.Select(file => new BlogEntry {FullPath = file}).ToList();
        return sb.OrderByDescending(t => t.FileDate).Skip(5).ToList();
    }

    public List<BlogEntry> GetRecent()
    {
        var files = Directory.GetFiles(directory, "*.txt");
        var sb = files.Select(file => new BlogEntry {FullPath = file}).ToList();
        return sb.OrderByDescending(t => t.FileDate).Take(5).ToList();
    }
}

public class BlogEntry
{
    public string FullPath { get; set; }

    public DateTime FileDate
    {
        get { return DateTime.ParseExact(Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(FullPath), "yyyyMMdd_HHmm", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture); }
    }

    public string FileContents
    {
        get { return File.ReadAllText(FullPath); }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I am basically looking to maintain a blog in a C# MVC website with as little code as possible not using a database. – Cyberdrew Dec 4 '12 at 22:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As long as you're sure there's only one writer to a file (ie: yourself), this can work. More than that, and you're likely to get into trouble. If you're okay with this restriction, though, all you need to do is make sure to use a FileStream with the appropriate FileShare enumeration. It's pretty easy if you wrap it in a StreamReader.

Write the property like this:

public string FileContents
{
    get { 
       using (var fs = new FileStream(FullPath, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite))
       using (var rdr = new StreamReader(fs))
       {
          return rdr.ReadToEnd();
       }

    }
}

For performance, if your server has the ram, you'll like do much better if you load these into a dictionary in memory the first time each record is asked for. Your code would look in the dictionary first and only read the file if the dictionary doesn't have it.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, thanks. I will just FTP text files up from time to time, I won't open or write to any of the existing files. Just out of curiosity, will I have any issues with Directory.GetFiles()? – Cyberdrew Dec 5 '12 at 0:06

The problem is ASP.Net is a multi-threaded, multiple concurrent user environment. The filesystem of the server is not. A database on the other hand is.

If you are only reading file contents, you have no problem. You just cannot use your web process to write to the same file. As soon as two users try you will have a IOException

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2  
Filesystems absolutely are meant for multiple concurrent users, anything else would be ridiculous (think of how many different users are running on a server at any given time, even just with HTTP and DB processes running). Similarly, databases can be and often are locked in a manner that blocks a lot of concurrency. This answer doesn't help solve the OP's problem at all. – ssube Dec 4 '12 at 22:42
    
Okay, go open a text file in notepad. Then open it in another notepad. Make changes in both. Save both. Observe the race condition. Now, write a console app, try to open the same file in both apps for writing. Observe the fact that the filesystem cannot handle concurrency. – matt-dot-net Dec 4 '12 at 23:07
    
Your examples of HTTP and DB processes are ridiculous. Just because we have multiple users on a machine doesn't mean they can all edit the same file on the filesystem concurrently. Imagine if your web process didn't serialize writes to its own request log. Imagine if your database process allowed multiple users to modify data tables without serialization! Banks would not like this. Databases HAVE to serialize transactions. It's their job. Web servers cannot allow many users to write to one text file. – matt-dot-net Dec 4 '12 at 23:13
    
Databases don't serialize transactions. They provide ACID transactional behavior. – Ondrej Tucny Dec 4 '12 at 23:31
    
Matt, I am not going to be modifying the files, just uploading them to the server. All I am worried about is multiple concurrent reads. Thanks. – Cyberdrew Dec 5 '12 at 0:08

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