Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible in windows cmd line to check all of the network addresses (with ping or similar) to see which ones are taken/ have active devices:

ie. something that does something like the following:

for i = 0 to 255
    ping 192.168.1.i //Print this
end

This is psuedo code obviously. I am wondering if it is possible to do something like this in windows cmd. It would be great if you didn't need a batch file, but i understand if this is impossible.

PS. Also please mention if there is a program to do this, but it would be nice to do it in cmd.

share|improve this question
    
I have no knoledge, just wondering... would ping 192.168.1.255 get responses from all the devices in the subnet? –  FrancescoMM Dec 4 '12 at 22:53
    
Hahaha, over 2000 views but no-one thinks this is a good question. –  Ben May 9 '13 at 1:08
    
thank you, good question –  DextrousDave May 27 '13 at 12:39
    
Awww thanks @DextrousDave –  Ben May 27 '13 at 23:44

8 Answers 8

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Open the Command Prompt and type in the following:

FOR /L %i IN (1,1,254) DO ping -n 1 192.168.10.%i | FIND /i "Reply">>c:\ipaddresses.txt

Change 192.168.10 to match you own network.

By using -n 1 you are asking for only 1 packet to be sent to each computer instead of the usual 4 packets.

The above command will ping all IP Addresses on the 192.168.10.0 network and create a text document in the C:\ drive called ipaddresses.txt. This text document should only contain IP Addresses that replied to the ping request.

Although it will take quite a bit longer to complete, you can also resolve the IP Addresses to HOST names by simply adding -a to the ping command.

FOR /L %i IN (1,1,254) DO ping -a -n 1 192.168.10.%i | FIND /i "Reply">>c:\ipaddresses.txt

This is from Here

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, however, it currently prints out that the find parameter is not correct. How can I fix that? –  Ben Dec 4 '12 at 22:56
    
Try to paste the command in a text editor and delete and re-add the quotes. The quotes you copy are some HTML encoded double quote. –  RGG Dec 4 '12 at 22:58
    
I've edited the post to fix the smart quotes. Should work now. :-) –  Mark Dec 5 '12 at 2:49
    
thanks for the answer...works like a bomb –  DextrousDave May 27 '13 at 12:43
    
This command appears to cause the command prompt to crash on Windows 8. –  Paul Lammertsma Sep 11 '13 at 18:55

Best Utility in terms of speed is Nmap.

write @ cmd prompt:

Nmap -sn -oG ip.txt 192.168.1.1-255

this will just ping all the ip addresses in the range given and store it in simple text file

It takes just 2 secs to scan 255 hosts using Nmap.

share|improve this answer
    
On my machine it took slightly longer than 2 seconds (maybe 10?); however, the batch file above takes about ten minutes, and I needed to run a lot of range searches, so this was the best route for me. –  slim Jul 7 at 13:24

All you are wanting to do is to see if computers are connected to the network and to gather their IP addresses. You can utilize angryIP scanner: http://www.angryip.org/w/Home to see what IP addresses are in use on a particular subnet or groups of subnets.

I have found this tool very helpful when trying to see what IPs are being used that are not located inside of my DHCP.

share|improve this answer

This post asks the same question, but for linux - you may find it helpful. Send a ping to each IP on a subnet

nmap is probably the best tool to use, as it can help identify host OS as well. It is available for the windows platform on the namp.org site

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, I have done it in Linux plenty of times, but not in windows. –  Ben Dec 4 '12 at 22:57
    
+1 to nmap, great tool! –  logray Dec 4 '12 at 23:34

Some things seem appeared to have changed in batch scripts on Windows 8, and the solution above by DGG now causes the Command Prompt to crash.

The following solution worked for me:

@echo off
set /a n=0
:repeat
set /a n+=1
echo 192.168.1.%n%
ping -n 1 -w 500 192.168.1.%n% | FIND /i "Reply">>ipaddresses.txt
if %n% lss 254 goto repeat
type ipaddresses.txt
share|improve this answer
@echo off
set /a n=0
:repeat
set /a n+=1
echo 192.168.1.%n%
ping -n 1 -w 500 192.168.1.%n% | FIND /i "Reply">>ipaddresses.txt
if %n% lss 254 goto repeat
type ipaddresses.txt
share|improve this answer

I know this is a late response, but a neat way of doing this is to ping the broadcast address which populates your local arp cache.

This can then be shown by running arp -a which will list all the addresses in you local arp table.

ping 192.168.1.255
arp -a

Hopefully this is a nice neat option that people can use.

share|improve this answer
@ECHO OFF

IF "%SUBNET%"=="" SET SUBNET=10

:ARGUMENTS
ECHO SUBNET=%SUBNET%
ECHO ARGUMENT %1 
IF "%1"=="SUM" GOTO SUM
IF "%1"=="SLOW" GOTO SLOW
IF "%1"=="ARP" GOTO ARP
IF "%1"=="FAST" GOTO FAST

REM PRINT ARP TABLE BY DEFAULT
:DEFAULT
ARP -a
GOTO END

REM METHOD 1 ADDRESS AT A TIME
:SLOW
ECHO START SCAN
ECHO %0 > ipaddresses.txt
DATE /T >> ipaddresses.txt
TIME /T >> ipaddresses.txt
FOR /L %%i IN (1,1,254) DO ping -a -n 2 192.168.%SUBNET%.%%i | FIND /i "TTL="  >> ipaddresses.txt
GOTO END

REM METHOD 2 MULTITASKING ALL ADDRESS AT SAME TIME
:FAST
ECHO START FAST SCANNING 192.168.%SUBNET%.X
set /a n=0
:FASTLOOP
set /a n+=1
ECHO 192.168.%SUBNET%.%n%
START CMD.exe /c call ipaddress.bat 192.168.%SUBNET%.%n% 
IF %n% lss 254 GOTO FASTLOOP
GOTO END

:SUM
ECHO START SUM
ECHO %0 > ipaddresses.txt
DATE /T >> ipaddresses.txt
TIME /T >> ipaddresses.txt
FOR /L %%i IN (1,1,254) DO TYPE ip192.168.%SUBNET%.%%i.txt | FIND /i "TTL=" >> ipaddresses.txt
FOR /L %%i IN (1,1,254) DO DEL ip192.168.%SUBNET%.%%i.txt
type ipaddresses.txt
GOTO END

:ARP
ARP -a >> ipaddresses.txt
type ipaddresses.txt
GOTO END


:END
ECHO DONE WITH IP SCANNING
ECHO OPTION "%0 SLOW" FOR SCANNING 1 AT A TIME
ECHO OPTION "%0 SUM" FOR COMBINE ALL TO FILE
ECHO OPTION "%0 ARP" FOR ADD ARP - IP LIST
ECHO PARAMETER "SET SUBNET=X" FOR SUBNET
ECHO.
share|improve this answer
2  
Could you explain what does your code do? –  Math Nov 8 '13 at 17:01
    
Welcome to SO! As Math noted, your answer isn't terribly useful without some context. Please edit your answer to add a description of what it does. –  Derek Nov 8 '13 at 17:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.