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I have a file which needs to be parsed. Although the problem is semmingly simple i am not getting any headway. The problem is following. the file contains data in a chunk of some 20-22 lines and then it is followed by unknown number of blank lines and then again chunk of 20-22 lines. i need to make a datastructure of theses chucks of data. I have tried the following

File f1 = new File(PATH_TO_TRAINING_FILE);
FileInputStream fis1 = new FileInputStream(f1);
readerTrainingFile = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fis1));
String trainLine;
while (( trainLine =readerTrainingFile.readLine()) != null) {
    ArrayList<String> train = new ArrayList<String>();
    while (!trainLine.trim().equals("")) {
        train.add(trainLine);
        trainLine =readerTrainingFile.readLine();
    }
    while (readerTrainingFile.readLine().trim().equals("")) {
    }
}

So the problem with the above code is while in the third while loop when i finish checking for the blank line then, the pointer of the read line move to the first non-space line of the next chunk. So, when my control reaches the first while loop, it skips two lines of the data i want. I am really sorry if the question is really easy. I am stuck on it for 2 days now. Thanks for any help.

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5 Answers 5

Refactor this so the line readerTrainingFile.readLine() appears only once in your program. Nested while loops are a great way to make life miserable for yourself. Use a continue statement if you need to skip lines. For debugging, System.out.println(trainLine) to see what you are reading and possibly skipping each time. These steps should solve your problem.

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Thanks, I will try to do this. –  shaun Dec 4 '12 at 23:08

Consider something like this

List<List<String>> trains = new ArrayList<List<String>>();
List<String> curTrain = null;
while (( trainLine=readerTrainingFile.readLine()) != null) {
    if (!trainLine.trim().equals(""))
        curTrain = null;
    else 
    {
        if (curTrain == null)
        {
            curTrain = new ArrayList<String>();
            trains.add(curTrain);
        }
        curTrain.add(trainLine)
    }
}

trains is a list containing all the chunks. While reading the data, curTrain refers to the chunk to which lines are currently being added. Each time you get a non-blank line you add it to the current chunk, but if there isn't a current chunk (because you're at the beginning, or one or more previous lines were blank) you create a new one and add it to the list of chunks.

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while (( trainLine =readerTrainingFile.readLine()) != null) {
            ArrayList<String> train = new ArrayList<String>();
            while (!trainLine.trim().equals("")) {
                train.add(trainLine);
                trainLine =readerTrainingFile.readLine();
            }
            while (readerTrainingFile.readLine().trim().equals("")) {

            }
 }

That's your problem. You read the line twice. Just put this code in the first while loop:

if (trainLine.trim().equals("")) {
    train.add(trainLine);
}

Also, another problem: move this:

ArrayList<String> train = new ArrayList<String>();

Out of the loop. Otherwise a new one will be made every time you read a line.

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Scanner scanner = new Scanner(f1);
ArrayList<String> train = new ArrayList<String>();
while(scanner.hasNextLine()){
    String temp = scanner.nextLine();
    if(!temp.trim().equals(""))
        train.add(temp);
}

You can replace scanner.hasNextLine with a buffered reader equivalent

(temp = reader.nextLine()) != null

But Scanner is a little easier to use + understand. You are adding the string from within the first while loop, so the arraylist is local and will not persist after the loop is finished (reader.nextLine() == null).

Note that you are using != and !.equals() on the same type. This is fine for strings, but typically .equals is for objects and == is for primitives (java treats string somewhere in between an object and a primitive).

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I don't know what those "chunks" represent, but I'd start by imagining a better abstraction than Lists of Strings.

Here's one way you might tackle it:

package cruft;

import org.apache.commons.io.IOUtils;
import org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils;

import java.io.*;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.TreeMap;

/**
 * FileChunkParser description here
 * @author Michael
 * @link
 * @since 12/4/12 6:06 PM
 */
public class FileChunkParser {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            File f = new File((args.length > 0) ? args[0] : "resources/chunk.txt");
            Reader reader = new FileReader(f);
            FileChunkParser parser = new FileChunkParser();
            Map<Integer, List<String>> chunks = parser.parse(reader);
            for (int index : chunks.keySet()) {
                System.out.println(String.format("index: %d chunk: %s", index, chunks.get(index)));
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public Map<Integer, List<String>> parse(Reader reader) throws IOException {
        Map<Integer, List<String>> chunks = new TreeMap<Integer, List<String>>();
        BufferedReader br = null;
        try {
            if (reader != null) {
                br = new BufferedReader(reader);
                int chunkCount = 0;
                String line = "";
                List<String> chunk = null;
                while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
                    if (StringUtils.isBlank(line)) {
                        if (chunk != null) {
                            chunks.put(chunkCount++, new LinkedList<String>(chunk));
                            chunk = null;
                        }
                        continue;
                    } else {
                        if (chunk == null) {
                            chunk = new LinkedList<String>();
                        }
                        chunk.add(line);
                    }
                }
                if (chunk != null) {
                    chunks.put(chunkCount++, chunk);
                }
            }
        } finally {
            IOUtils.closeQuietly(reader);
        }
        return chunks;
    }
}

I ran it with this input file:

this
is
how
you
do
it



see
how
it
handles
arbitrary
sized
chunks
with
any
blank
lines
between

try
it
and
see

And here's the output:

index: 0 chunk: [this, is, how, you, do, it]
index: 1 chunk: [see, how, it, handles, arbitrary, sized, chunks, with, any, blank, lines, between]
index: 2 chunk: [try, it, and, see]
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