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I have two models, Song and Show. A Show is an ordered list of Songs, in which the same Song can be listed multiple times.

That is, there should be an ordered array (or hash or anything) somewhere in Show that can contain Song1, Song2, Song1, Song3 and allow re-ordering, inserting, or deleting from that array.

I cannot figure out how to model this with ActiveRecord associations. I'm guessing I need some sort of special join table with a column for the index, but apart from starting to code my SQL directly, is there a way to do this with Rails associations?

Some code as I have it now (but doesn't work properly):

class Song < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :title
  has_and_belongs_to_many :shows
end

class Show < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :date
  has_and_belongs_to_many :songs
end

song1 = Song.create(title: 'Foo')
song2 = Song.create(title: 'Bar')
show1 = Show.create(date: 'Tomorrow')

show1.songs << song1 << song2 << song1

puts "show1 size = #{show1.songs.size}" # 3
show1.delete_at(0) # Should delete the first instance of song1, but leave the second instance
puts "show1 size = #{show1.songs.size}" # 2
show1.reload
puts "show1 size = #{show1.songs.size}" # 3 again, annoyingly

Inserting might look like:

show1.songs # Foo, Bar, Foo
song3 = Song.create(title: 'Baz')
show1.insert(1, song3)
show1.songs # Foo, Baz, Bar, Foo

And reordering might (with a little magic) look something like:

show1.songs # Foo, Bar, Foo
show1.move_song_from(0, to: 1)
show1.songs # Bar, Foo, Foo
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2 Answers 2

You're on the right track with the join table idea:

class Song < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :title
  has_many :playlist_items
  has_many :shows, :through => :playlist_items
end

class PlaylistItem < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :shows #foreign_key show_id
  belongs_to :songs #foreign_key song_id
end

class Show < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :date
  has_many :playlist_items
  has_many :songs, :through => :playlist_items
end

Then you can do stuff like user.playlist_items.create :song => Song.last

share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting that a has_many :through is the ticket, but this seems still to be much like habtm. How would I delete a Song at a specific index in the Show? That is, something like show.playlist_items.delete_at(4)? –  sirbrillig Dec 5 '12 at 4:59
    
Yes that's how you would delete them. You're right they are similar (both use join tables) but I prefer using has_many => :through because it gives you direct access to the join table (in case you need to add validations/extra attributes and the like). –  David Dec 5 '12 at 21:11
    
Speaking of which, did you create a shows_songs(show_id:integer, song_id:integer) join table for the habtm you have above? –  David Dec 5 '12 at 21:15
    
I did, yes. After a good bit of hacking at this, I realized that the aspect I wanted but hadn't explicitly added was some means of ordering the items. I'll write my solution below. –  sirbrillig Dec 6 '12 at 4:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

My current solution to this is a combination of has_many :through and acts_as_list. It was not the easiest thing to find information on combining the two correctly. One of the hurdles, for example, was that acts_as_list uses an index starting at 1, while the array-like methods created by the ActiveRecord association start at 0.

Here's how my code ended up. Note that I had to specify explicit methods to modify the join table (for most of them anyway); I'm not sure if there's a cleaner way to make those work.

class Song < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :title
  has_many :playlist_items, :order => :position
  has_many :shows, :through => :playlist_items
end

class PlaylistItem < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :position, :show_id, :song_id
  belongs_to :shows 
  belongs_to :songs
  acts_as_list :scope => :show
end

class Show < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :date
  has_many :playlist_items, :order => :position
  has_many :songs, :through => :playlist_items, :order => :position

  def song_at(index)
    self.songs.find_by_id(self.playlist_items[index].song_id)
  end

  def move_song(index, options={})
    raise "A :to option is required." unless options.has_key? :to
    self.playlist_items[index].insert_at(options[:to] + 1) # Compensate for acts_as_list starting at 1
  end

  def add_song(location)
    self.songs << location
  end

  def remove_song_at(index)
    self.playlist_items.delete(self.playlist_items[index])
  end
end

I added a 'position' column to my 'playlist_items' table, as per the instructions that came with acts_as_list. It's worth noting that I had to dig into the API for acts_as_list to find the insert_at method.

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