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I want to create an array of structures:

typedef struct
{
   int id;
   int department;
}employee;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
 int i;
 employee job[3];   ////////////////error
 for (i=0;i<3;i++)
 {
    //do something
 }  
return 0;
}

the issue is that when I want to compile I got the following error:

syntax error before ';' token and points to the line that I marked

Any help?

Thanks

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closed as too localized by AAA, Jim Lewis, Evgeny Kluev, Frank van Puffelen, Sgoettschkes Dec 5 '12 at 20:46

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5  
This code compiles fine for me. Is there more code that you're not showing, that might be causing the error? –  Xymostech Dec 5 '12 at 0:41
    
by the way, there is no more code and I am using Dev C++ –  Layla Dec 5 '12 at 0:50
    
Did you copy and paste your exact code? And are you sure there's nothing else, for example, is there something inside of that //do something comment? –  Xymostech Dec 5 '12 at 0:52
    
no I just put the //do something part as it is, I didn´t do anything else –  Layla Dec 5 '12 at 0:53
    
Try copying the code off of this website into your IDE, and compiling that. –  Xymostech Dec 5 '12 at 0:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That code, as it stands alone, is fine, as per the following transcript:

pax> cat qq.c
typedef struct {
   int id;
   int department;
} employee;

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    int i;
    employee job[3];   ////////////////error
    for (i=0;i<3;i++) {
        //do something
    }  
   return 0;
}
pax> gcc -o qq qq.c
pax> 

. Some things you may want to check are:

  • Has anything #defined something like employee or job?
  • Are you sure employee is spelt identically in both places?
  • Are you sure you have all those semicolons you claim to have?
  • Are there any "funny" characters in your code (ones that seem invisible but still stuff up your input stream to the compiler)?

A good first start would be to comment out the errant line and see if you get the error on the following line. That should narrow it down to either that line (no error) or a previous line (still have error).

You can see the entire file in hex mode (looking for funny characters) if you do something like:

od -xcb myfile.c

(under Linux - Windows I'm not sure though, if you have gvim, you can convert it to hex with a menu item).

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I think you're right about the funny characters thing. Seems like the only explanation. –  Xymostech Dec 5 '12 at 0:59
    
there was some sort of strange character there, thanks –  Layla Dec 5 '12 at 0:59

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