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So I have a simple loop in MATLAB that does the following:

for p = 1:100

  x = 4.*randn(1,100);
  y = 7.*randn(1,100);

  figure(1) 
  plot(randn(1,100));

  figure(2);
  plot(randn(1,100));

end

The x and y are made up, but that is the jist of it. Anyway, when I run this code, not surprisingly, MATLAB will make two figures and plot accordingly. The problem is, I get a sort of 'blinking' between figures when I do this, and it makes the quality of seeing x and y evolve over time poorer.

I discovered a way to make one of the plots smoother like this:

figure(1);
for p = 1:100

  x = 4.*randn(1,100);
  y = 7.*randn(1,100);

  plot(randn(1,100));
  drawnow

 end

If I do this, then of course figure(1) will plot very smoothly showing x nicely, without figure(1) 'blinking' between plots, but now I cant show figure(2) or y!

How can I plot both those quantities on different figures (not subplots) smoothly without 'blinking'?

EDIT:

Thanks Geodesic for your answer, the solution works, however there is a subtlety that I did not think would be an issue, however it is.

1) I am unable to use 'imagesc' with this solution.

For example,

figure(1);
aone = axes;
figure(2);
atwo = axes;

for p = 1:100

  x = 4.*randn(1,100);
  y = 7.*rand(10,100);


  plot(aone,x);
  drawnow;
  imagesc(atwo,y);
  drawnow;
end

In this case the part with imagesc(atwo, y) crashes.

share|improve this question

Your flicker is because you're generating each figure window again and again through the loop, which is forcing the window to come to the foreground each time. Generate the figures first, attach some axes to them, and plot your data to each axis like so:

figure(1);
aone = axes;
figure(2);
atwo = axes;
for p = 1:100

  x = 4.*randn(1,100);
  y = 7.*randn(1,100);


  plot(aone,randn(1,100));
  drawnow;
  imagesc(y,'Parent',atwo);
  drawnow;
end

Edit: functions like plot take an axis argument directly, but imagesc does not. In this particular case you'll need to send a Property Name/Value pair in as an argument. The 'Parent' of the image generated will be our axis atwo (see above).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Geodesic. Can you please elaborate on what exactly drawnow is doing? I read the doc but Im still not sure what it is really doing. Thanks! – Learnaholic Dec 5 '12 at 4:15
    
Essentially it's forcing Matlab to update the figure window at that point in the code execution. If you take the drawnow commands out of this loop, you'll see that there indeed is output on your two axes, but most likely you'll only see the p=100 values (rather than each set of values in the for loop). It's possible your computer is running this example too fast for you to see this. Change p to 1:1000 or 1:10000 and you should see what I mean. – Geodesic Dec 5 '12 at 4:55
    
Geodesic, thanks for your answer, however there is a subtlety is becoming an issue, even though I thought it wouldn't. I have edited the question accordingly. – Learnaholic Dec 5 '12 at 16:08
    
Yes, that's true - imagesc doesn't like taking an axis handle directly. Edited my answer accordingly. – Geodesic Dec 6 '12 at 6:35

For p = 1, create the plots you need, using the plot command or the imagesc command. Keep the handle of the resulting graphics object by getting an output argument: for example h = plot(.... or h = imagesc(..... This will be a Handle Graphics lineseries or image object, or something else, depending on the particular plot type you create.

For p = 2:100, don't use the plotting commands directly, but instead update the relevant Data properties of the original Handle Graphics object h. For example, for a lineseries object resulting from a plot command, set its XData and YData properties to the new data. For an image object resulting from an imagesc command, set its CData property to the new image.

If necessary, call drawnow after updating to force a flush of the graphics queue.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that worked like a charm. I take it once the 'h = imagesc(zeros(10,10))' is made, the 'cdata' is set to 10x10? That seems to be the case at least. I cant imagesc with something with a different size. Anyway, its not a problem, just something I observed. – Learnaholic Dec 5 '12 at 17:31

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