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Is it possible to create a type (let's say degrees) and define specific operators for it? Such as: =, +, *, -, /, +=, *=, -=, /=.

I'm wondering this because I need to use degrees for one of my programs and I don't want to use a float object because using degrees a; a.value = 120; a.value = b.value + a.value; is redundant over a simple degrees a = 120; a = b+a;.

Now why don't I just use:

typedef float degrees;

? Well, because I need one more thing. When I write

degrees a;
a = 120;
a += 300;

a should be equal to 60 (420-360) because I don't really need a = 6150 when I can have a = 30 with the same effect. So I'd overload those operators to keep the value between 0 and 360.

Is it possible? And, if so, how?

share|improve this question
    
Absolutely. Where do you get stuck? – Vaughn Cato Dec 5 '12 at 3:06
    
Is it possible to create a type (let's say degrees) and define for it specific operators? Of course, through classes and operator overloading. Those are language features. – chris Dec 5 '12 at 3:06
1  
Just because it is a class doesn't mean you have to do things like that. – Vaughn Cato Dec 5 '12 at 3:09
1  
Just having a class overloading the assignment, binary arithmetic, and compound assignment operators would give you the syntax you request. – amc Dec 5 '12 at 3:15
1  
You can code a degree class, with operator overloaded, this will allow to do things like a = 120 ; a = b+a ; You have to use class, otherwise you can choose other language not C++, like Pascal allows you define subrange. Like in Pascal, type degree = 420..360 ; var a:degree ; – tomriddle_1234 Dec 5 '12 at 3:19
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The solution to your problem doesn't need Boost or any other libraries. You can achieve what you want by using C++ classes, and overloading both the mathematical operators you want (+, -, *, /, etc) and the assignment operators you want (=, +=, -=, etc) and the comparison operators you want (<, >, <=, >=, etc)... or really any operators you want!

For example:

#include <cmath>

class Degrees {
public:
    // *** constructor/other methods here ***
    Degrees& operator=(float rhs) {
        value = rhs;
        normalize();
        return *this;
    }
    Degrees& operator+=(const Degrees &rhs) {
        value += rhs.value;
        normalize();
        return *this;
    }
    Degrees operator+(const Degrees &rhs) {
        return Degrees(value + rhs.value);
    }

private:
    float value;
    void normalize() {
        value = std::fmod(value, 360);
    }
};

Then you can do things like this:

Degrees a, b; // suppose constructor initializes value = 0 in all of them
a = 10;
b = 20;
a += b; // now, a = 30.
Degrees c = a + b; // now, c = 50.

I've given you an example for overloading assignment and plus operators, but you can try this same thing with any other kind, and it should work.

share|improve this answer
3  
fmodf is deprecated, you should use std::fmod . – tomriddle_1234 Dec 5 '12 at 3:28
2  
This might be a noob question but isn't this a pointer? Why are you using this.*? – Shoe Dec 5 '12 at 3:32
3  
There is no need for the assignment operator here. The Degree argument should already be in accordance to the class's contract. – GManNickG Dec 5 '12 at 3:35
2  
Seems to me some of these are a little more complex than necessary. For example, is there any reason that operator+ couldn't be just return Degrees(value + rhs.value);? – Jerry Coffin Dec 5 '12 at 3:46
1  
Yes, @Jeffrey, this is a pointer. The use of this.value is an error. – Robᵩ Dec 5 '12 at 5:43

Here is a starting place:

class Degrees {
  public:
    explicit Degrees(float value) : value(normalized(value)) { }

    Degrees &operator+=(Degrees that)
    {
      value += that.value;
      return *this;
    }
  private:
    float value;
};

inline Degrees operator+(Degrees a,Degrees b)
{
  a += b;
  return a;
}

Example usage:

{
  Degrees a(120);
  Degrees b(300);
  Degrees c = a+b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is one case where I'd consider an implicit conversion constructor good. – aschepler Dec 5 '12 at 3:15
    
(Style-wise, you should put mutating operators, like +=, as members, and then define non-mutating operators, like +, as free-functions that delegate to the member: Degrees operator+(Degrees first, const Degrees& second) { first += second; return first; }.) – GManNickG Dec 5 '12 at 3:15
1  
@Jeffrey: You certainly could have a method to get the value, but you wouldn't need to use it often. – Vaughn Cato Dec 5 '12 at 3:20
2  
@Jeffrey: No, member functions can access private members. – Vaughn Cato Dec 5 '12 at 3:23
3  
@Jeffrey, If you're confused because this object accesses the other object's value, it's on a class level, not an object level. They both belong to the same class, so they both have access to each other's private members. – chris Dec 5 '12 at 3:25

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