Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

that is the exact code then i have a switch for case 0: and case 1: it seems that the case 1: is coming out every time, i would like to have a 50/50 chance of 0 or 1 coming out is this the correct way or should i use 1.5 or how exactly does this work?

talka = (int)(Math.random() * 1);
        switch(talka)
        {

        case 0:
        {
            talk.setAnimationListener(this);
            talk.playtimes(1,24);
            startService(new Intent(this, love1.class));
            break;
        }
        case 1:
        {
            talk.setAnimationListener(this);
            talk.playtimes(1,12);
            startService(new Intent(this, love2.class));
            break;
        }
        }
share|improve this question
    
Note that Math.random() returns double value between 0.0 and 1.0 – Stanley Dec 5 '12 at 4:07
    
half/half, since random() returns the uniformly distributed value. – zsong Dec 5 '12 at 4:09
    
He is casting the value to int – Stanley Dec 5 '12 at 4:12
    
so if i use Math.round(Math.random() * 1) it would be more of a 50/50 chance? – JRowan Dec 5 '12 at 4:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem has to do with the way the cast works.

In may test, Java was basically "trimming" the decimal result off and simply taking the "integer" component. However, if I rounded the result, I got it flipping between 0 and 1.

Have a play

int ones = 0;
int zeros = 0;
for (int index = 0; index < 100; index++) {

    double rand = Math.random() * 1;
    if (Math.round(rand) == 1) {
        ones++;
    } else {
        zeros++;
    }
    System.out.println(rand + " - " + (int)Math.round(rand) + " - " + (int)Math.random() * 1);

}

System.out.println("Ones = " + ((float)ones / 100f));
System.out.println("Zeros = " + ((float)zeros / 100f));

It my simple test, I was getting around the 50/50 mark (+/-)

As pointed out by Hovercraft, better to use java.util.Random in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks casting to an (int) just rips the dicimal off, got it – JRowan Dec 5 '12 at 4:21

Just use a java.util.Random object and simply call nextBoolean() on it which will return true or false in a 50:50 distribution. Easy as Math.PI.

share|improve this answer

This always rounds down.

talka = (int)(Math.random() * 1); // between 0 and 0

what you intended was perhaps

talka = (int)(Math.random() * 2); // between 0 and 1

However, using Math.random() get one bit is very inefficient.

If you use a Random with either

talka = random.nextInt(2);

or even better

talk.setAnimationListener(this);
if (random.nextBoolean()) {
        talk.playtimes(1,24);
        startService(new Intent(this, love1.class));
} else {
        talk.playtimes(1,12);
        startService(new Intent(this, love2.class));
}
share|improve this answer

The variable talka will always be zero; Math.random returns a value where 0 <= x < 1; since x must be less than 1 and the (int) cast truncates the decimal component, the integer result will always be 0.

From the Math.random documentation:

Returns a double value with a positive sign, greater than or equal to 0.0 and less than 1.0.

Use java.util.Random.nextBoolean() instead.

share|improve this answer

- It would be better and easier to go with java.util.Random.

- Use the nextBoolean() method of its.

Eg:

public class Rand {

    public static void main(String[] args){

        Random r = new Random();

        System.out.println(r.nextBoolean());  // See there is a equal
                                                      // true-false division
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.