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I would like to delete columns 1,2,4,5,6,10,11,12 from space delimited text files.I want to delete these columns from the existing files instead of printing output. How can I do this with sed?

MMMM   1522  KL1 PPP A 201      -7.299   41.933  48.192  1.00 31.52           G
MMMM     22  G   SSS A   3       39.541  25.078  -2.722  1.00 30.47           B  

Desired output

KL1    -7.299   41.933  48.192
G       39.541  25.078  -2.722
share|improve this question
    
Are there any columns beyond column 12? If so, how many? – Jonathan Leffler Dec 5 '12 at 6:36
    
No. 12 is the last column. – lara Dec 5 '12 at 6:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

sed wouldn't be ideal. Use cut:

cut -d ' ' --complement -f -2,4-6,10-12 file.txt

EDIT:

From additional information from the comments:

< file.txt awk '{ print $3, $7, $8, $9 }' | column -t

Results:

KL1  -7.299  41.933  48.192
G    39.541  25.078  -2.722

To overwrite your file, you'll need to use a temporary file:

< file.txt awk '{ print $3, $7, $8, $9 }' | column -t > tmpfile && mv tmpfile file.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. Your code doesn't work. I want to delete columns from the existing files.Please help me. – lara Dec 5 '12 at 6:39
    
@lara: Could you be a little more specific? What is your error message? Is your delimiter a single space, any amount of whitespace or a tab? The code is working correctly. Perhaps you should edit your question to include some sample input. – Steve Dec 5 '12 at 6:48
    
I have edited my question. – lara Dec 5 '12 at 7:08
    
Thank you. Is it possible to delete columns from the original files instead of printing the output? – lara Dec 5 '12 at 7:22
1  
Thank you very much!! – lara Dec 5 '12 at 7:48

If is is a real task (not homework) it is better to do with awk:

awk '{for(i=1;i<=NF;++i) if (i != 1 && i!=2 && i!=4 && i!=5 && i!=6 && i!=10 && i!=11 && i!=12) printf("%s ", $i);  printf("\n"); }' f.txt

Or if you need to print only columns number 3, 7, 8, 9 :

awk '{print $3" "$7" "$8" "$9}' f.txt
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/^(\S+\s+){3}(\S+\s+){3}((\S+\s+){2}\S+).*/\1\3/' file

Or alternatively:

sed -r 's/^\S+\s+\S+\s+(\S+\s+)\S+\s+\S+\s+\S+\s+(\S+\s+\S+\s+\S+).*/\1\2/' file

or for most sed variations:

sed -e 's/^[^ ][^ ]*  *[^ ][^ ]*  *\([^ ][^ ]*  *\)[^ ][^ ]*  *[^ ][^ ]*  *[^ ][^ ]*  *\([^ ][^ ]*  *[^ ][^ ]*  *[^ ][^ ]*\).*/\1\2/' file
share|improve this answer
    
+1 But don't forget to mention the -i flag. – Steve Dec 5 '12 at 7:22
> echo "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12"|perl -F -ane '$F[0]=$F[1]=$F[3]=$F[4]=$F[5]=$F[9]=$F[10]=$F[11]="";print "@F";'
  3    7 8 9

in awk:

echo "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12" | awk '{$1=$2=$4=$5=$6=$10=$11=$12="";print}'
3    7 8 9 
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