Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone explain, at a level that a novice C programmer would understand, what this function does?

unsigned getunsigned(unsigned char *bufp, int len) {
    unsigned value = 0;
    int shift = 0;
    while (len--) {
        value |= *bufp++ << shift;
        shift += 8;
    }
    return value;
}

I guess the line that's giving me the most trouble to wrap my head around is:

value |= *bufp++ << shift;

Also, can anyone provide a way to re-write this so that it is more clear for an inexperienced C programmer to understand?

I found this code online while doing research for an assignment and I prefer not to use it unless I understand fully what it's doing and how it's doing it.

share|improve this question
    
*bufp++ should be cast to unsigned before the left-shift. Otherwise, it is promoted to int by default, and, when the shift is for the highest byte, the result may exceed what is representable in an int. Then the behavior is undefined. –  Eric Postpischil Dec 5 '12 at 10:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is taking successive bytes from the buffer pointed to by bufp, and putting them into value.

The value |= *bufp++ << shift; is taking the value at bufp (i.e., the char at the address bufp is pointing at) and ORing it with 8 bits of value. Then it's incrementing bufp to point go the next byte in the buffer. After that, it adds 8 to shift -- that's what determined which 8 bits of value the new bytes gets ORed. I.e., shift starts as 0, so in the first iteration, the first byte of bufp replaces the bottom 8 bits of value (replaces, because they're starting out as 0). In the next iterator, the next byte of bufp gets shifted left 8 bytes, to replace the next 8 bits of value, and so on for len bytes.

Aside: if len is greater than sizeof(unsigned), this is going to write past the end of value, causing undefined behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand now. Thanks for your detailed explanation. –  Justin Kredible Dec 5 '12 at 15:44
value |= *bufp++ << shift;

is equivalent to

value = value | (*bufp << shift);
bufp++;
share|improve this answer
1  
@rekire. No, not at all. You should do a little reading on how bitwise OR works. The only time they would be equivalent, is if the bitwise intersection (AND) of the operands was zero. In other words, 0x10 | 0x04 == 0x10 + 0x04 == 0x14. But 0x10 | 0x10 != 0x10 + 0x10 –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 5 '12 at 6:16
    
Actually, it is equivalent to value = (uint8_t)(value | ((int)*bufp << shift)); bufp++; because of integer promotions. In this particular case, I don't think the integer promotions will cause any bugs though. –  Lundin Dec 5 '12 at 7:58
    
@Lundin: When *bufp is promoted to an int and left-shifted, it may produce a value not representable in an int. Then the behavior is undefined. –  Eric Postpischil Dec 5 '12 at 10:10
    
@EricPostpischil Only if the original uint8_t contained a negative value, but it cannot do that, it can only hold values from 0-255. So that's why this particular case will work (out of luck). –  Lundin Dec 5 '12 at 10:27
1  
@Lundin: First, it is an unsigned char, not a uint8_t. Second, if the vale is, for example, 0x80, and is shifted 24 bits in a 32-bit int, the result would be 0x80000000. This is not representable in a 32-bit int, so the result is undefined per C 2011 6.5.7 4. –  Eric Postpischil Dec 5 '12 at 11:38
value |= *bufp++ << shift;

is equivalent to

value =  value | (*bufp << shift);
bufp++;

first value at bufp is shifted to the value in shift and the resultant is ORed | with value and then bufp is incremented.

At last value of shift is changed by shift +=8 means shift = shift + 8

So it takes all the bytes in the bufp because while loop won't terminate until len becomes 0.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.