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So, I think it's a bit odd to have a Save method which does not return the entity which has just been successfully saved. However, the entity passed into Save is modified by the function.

Example:

//T SaveOrUpdate(T entity); from IDao
PlaylistDao.SaveOrUpdate(playlist);

This function takes a playlist, saves it to the database, and returns the saved playlist. But, the paramater being passed into SaveOrUpdate is reference equals to its return value.

With this in mind, which is a more clear implementation:

public void SavePlaylist(Playlist playlist)
{
    try
    {
        NHibernateSessionManager.Instance.BeginTransaction();
        PlaylistDao.SaveOrUpdate(playlist);
        NHibernateSessionManager.Instance.CommitTransaction();
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        Logger.Error(exception);
        throw;
    }
}

vs

public Playlist SavePlaylist(Playlist playlist)
{
    Playlist savedPlayist;
    try
    {
        NHibernateSessionManager.Instance.BeginTransaction();
        savedPlayist = PlaylistDao.SaveOrUpdate(playlist);
        NHibernateSessionManager.Instance.CommitTransaction();
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        Logger.Error(exception);
        throw;
    }

    return savedPlayist;
}

I think that the second function is more clear to someone who has not seen the code before, but the first implementation is more succinct and more clear once the developer understands. Any thoughts?

UPDATE: To be clear, SaveOrUpdate has side-effects on playlist. When playlist is saved to the database, its ID field is updated with a value provided by the DB.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would go for the first method but with a small change--pass the argument with ref. (See the comments.) The problem I have with the second is that you are creating an extra variable unnecessarily. Why not just add some <summary> tags to the first method, indicating in intellisense what is going to happen to clarify any confusion? For me, this is better than creating an extra variable to essentially do the same thing.

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what if you assign null to playerlist object in SaveOrUpdate method, would you see the effect in SavePlaylist method ? –  Habib Dec 5 '12 at 6:45
    
I'm not sure if I understand the question. If the object is passed by reference (which it is) then any modification will be propagated to the original instance. –  Levi Botelho Dec 5 '12 at 6:58
    
umm, object passed by reference, actually passes the reference by value, so if you assign it null, you will not see the effect in the caller. See Parameter passing c# by Jon Skeet –  Habib Dec 5 '12 at 7:01
    
Yes but if you pass it using ref that takes care of it no? (I know he didn't do this in his example but this would be a minor change) –  Levi Botelho Dec 5 '12 at 7:02
    
Yes, with ref it would behave correctly, –  Habib Dec 5 '12 at 7:12

In the first Method, you are simply returning the parameter value, without any change at all with the side effect. I don't think its either clear or useful. Your second method seems more useful.

EDIT: based on the comment.

I don't think, your method SaveOrUpdate should do such thing. Its better to return a value, What if some exception or due to any unexpected situation you want to do:

playerlist = null;

in your SaveOrUpdate method, you will not see the effect on your original object in SavePlaylist method. Since the object reference is passed by value :). Whereas in your second method it will have the effect on the object, and that would be reflected more clearly. Your first method would be more clear if you pass the parameter with ref keyword.

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When the entity is saved to the database it is given an ID value. The method SaveOrUpdate has side-effects on playlist. –  Sean Anderson Dec 5 '12 at 6:34
    
@SeanAnderson, check the edit, and the chance if you want to assign null to your playerlist object in SaveOrUpdate method –  Habib Dec 5 '12 at 6:38

Maybe it would be better to return boolen? false in case of issues? then it is easy to check for returned value

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1  
That's what exceptions are for. Using return codes to evaluate a success is not a good practice. –  alzaimar Dec 5 '12 at 6:51

I guess this is more preference based and the important thing is to pick one model and stick to that.

My personal opinion is second method is the best. Here are my reasons.

  • Save method has side effects, i.e it changes the object passed into it. Even though these changes are available back to the caller via object reference that might not be fully visible to someone who reads your code, without actually looking into the save method.

I think first line conveys the idea of modified object than the next line

// Side effect is better understood
paylist = PlaylistDao.SaveOrUpdate(playlist);

// Side effect is not obvious unless looked into the SaveOrUpdate method.
PlaylistDao.SaveOrUpdate(playlist);

This why some people prefer functional languages than procedural languages, since functional language do not allow side effects, but enforce returning of modified values. Even though you are not using a functional language, I think there are benifits of following that pattern.

  • Other reason is, returning the modified values allow you to construct a fluent APIs which are much nicer to work with, (ONLY when you add methods to the Playlist class however, this doesn't apply when you have the SaveOrUpdate method on the DAO).

For example if you always return the new object from your method, you can have calls like.

playlist.SaveOrUpdate().WriteToLog(); // Something like this.
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The second attempt leaves two lists in the system. The Playlist with invalid entries and a savedPlaylist with valid entries (valid = current). Ooops, when an exception occurs, the savedPlaylist is invalid and the Playlist is still valid... Get the problem?

The first attempt always leavs the Playlist having current values. Either all is saved and updated and new instances have a unique ID etc, or nothing is changed and the list still contains unsaved data.

BTW: I don't think that the PlayList is passed by reference. The list instance itself is not modified, only its contents. And even if the instance itself would change, these changes would be invisible outside of the method as the method itself declares the parameter 'Playlist' as input only.

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Playlist will be passed by reference and any modification done to that will be visible after the method exits, because its a reference type. Reference itself will be copied when method is called, but since it points to the same Playlist instance it is like passing by reference. –  BuddhiP Dec 5 '12 at 7:00
    
Shouldn't it say 'ref' then? But you are right in one point. The Playlist is a reference (to an object). I am quite sure that the 'pointer' is passed as a value. So this type of parameter passing is called 'pass by value'. A 'pass by reference' would allow the called method to change the instance. –  alzaimar Dec 5 '12 at 22:23
    
No, you need not to, UNLESS you plan to change to where this pointer points to, for example if all you are going to do is playlist.X = y; playlist.Z = w; then you don't need to use the ref key as it's anyhow going to modify the same object instance passed into it. Objects are not copied or cloned when passed into a method. However, if you plan to do something like playlist = new CoolPlayList(); and you want that change to be available to the callee, then you need the ref keyword so pointer is changed, not the instance it points to. –  BuddhiP Dec 6 '12 at 1:37
1  
You don't get me, I know all that. You use the term 'passed by reference' and this is not true in this case. The object's reference is passed as a value, so the method used in passing the object (i.e. it's pointer) is called 'call by value'. To make it clear what I mean: If you use the term 'call by reference' you need to add the keyword 'ref' or 'out'. A call by value is indicated by the absence of these words, no matter WHAT you pass to a method. Naturally, you can pass references as value and values as references, so don't mix it up. –  alzaimar Dec 6 '12 at 6:49
    
Okay, I agree. :) –  BuddhiP Dec 6 '12 at 9:20

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