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I have deployed Java code on two different servers.The code is doing File Writing operations.

On the local server ,parameters are :

uname -a

SunOS snmi5001 5.10 Generic_120011-14 sun4u sparc SUNW,SPARC-Enterprise

ulimit -a

time(seconds)        unlimited
file(blocks)         unlimited
data(kbytes)         unlimited
stack(kbytes)        389296
coredump(blocks)     unlimited
nofiles(descriptors) 20000
vmemory(kbytes)      unlimited

Java Version:

java version "1.5.0_12"
Java(TM) 2 Runtime Environment, Standard Edition (build 1.5.0_12-b04)
Java HotSpot(TM) Server VM (build 1.5.0_12-b04, mixed mode)

On a Different(lets say MIT) server :

uname -a

SunOS au11qapcwbtels2 5.10 Generic_147440-05 sun4u sparc SUNW,Sun-Fire-15000

ulimit -a

time(seconds)        unlimited
file(blocks)         unlimited
data(kbytes)         unlimited
stack(kbytes)        8192
coredump(blocks)     unlimited
nofiles(descriptors) 256
vmemory(kbytes)      unlimited

java -version

java version "1.5.0_32"
Java(TM) 2 Runtime Environment, Standard Edition (build 1.5.0_32-b05)
Java HotSpot(TM) Server VM (build 1.5.0_32-b05, mixed mode)

The problem is that the code is running signficatly slower on the MIT server. Because of the difference in nofiles and stack for the two OS's ,i thought if i change the ulimit -s and ulimit -n it would make a difference. I cannot change the parameters on MIT server without confirming the problem,so the decreased the ulimit parameters for the local server and retested.But code finished execution is same time.

I have no idea what difference between the OS parameters which could be causing this. Any help is appreciated.I will post more paramters if anyone tells me what to look for.

EDIT:

For MIT Server

No of CPU: psrinfo -p 24 psrinfo -pv

The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (0 4)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 0 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (1 5)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 1 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (2 6)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 2 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (3 7)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 3 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (32 36)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 32 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (33 37)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 33 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (34 38)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 34 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (35 39)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 35 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (64 68)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 64 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (65 69)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 65 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (66 70)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 66 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (67 71)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 67 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (96 100)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 96 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (97 101)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 97 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (98 102)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 98 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (99 103)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 99 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (128 132)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 128 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (129 133)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 129 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (130 134)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 130 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (131 135)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 131 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (224 228)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 224 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (225 229)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 225 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (226 230)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 226 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
The physical processor has 2 virtual processors (227 231)
  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 227 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)

kstat cpu_info :

module: cpu_info                        instance: 231
name:   cpu_info231                     class:    misc
       brand                           UltraSPARC-IV+
       chip_id                         227
       clock_MHz                       1800
       core_id                         231
       cpu_fru                         hc:///component=SB7
       cpu_type                        sparcv9
       crtime                          587.102844985
       current_clock_Hz                1799843256
       device_ID                       9223937394446500460
       fpu_type                        sparcv9
       implementation                  UltraSPARC-IV+ (portid 227 impl 0x19 ver 0x24 clock 1800 MHz)
       pg_id                           48
       snaptime                        19846866.5310415
       state                           on-line
       state_begin                     1334854522

For the Local server i could only get the kstat info :

module: cpu_info                        instance: 0
name:   cpu_info0                       class:    misc
        brand                           SPARC64-VI
        chip_id                         1024
        clock_MHz                       2150
        core_id                         0
        cpu_fru                         hc:///component=/MBU_A/CPUM0
        cpu_type                        sparcv9
        crtime                          288.5675516
        device_ID                       250691889836161
        fpu_type                        sparcv9
        implementation                  SPARC64-VI (portid 1024 impl 0x6 ver 0x93 clock 2150 MHz)
        snaptime                        207506.8330168
        state                           on-line
        state_begin                     1354493257

module: cpu_info                        instance: 1
name:   cpu_info1                       class:    misc
        brand                           SPARC64-VI
        chip_id                         1024
        clock_MHz                       2150
        core_id                         0
        cpu_fru                         hc:///component=/MBU_A/CPUM0
        cpu_type                        sparcv9
        crtime                          323.4572206
        device_ID                       250691889836161
        fpu_type                        sparcv9
        implementation                  SPARC64-VI (portid 1024 impl 0x6 ver 0x93 clock 2150 MHz)
        snaptime                        207506.8336113
        state                           on-line
        state_begin                     1354493292

Similarly total 59 instances .

Also the memory for local server : vmstat

 kthr      memory            page            disk          faults      cpu
 r b w   swap  free  re  mf pi po fr de sr s0 s1 s4 s1   in   sy   cs us sy id
 0 0 0 143845984 93159232 431 895 1249 30 29 0 2 6 0 -0 1 3284 72450 6140 11 3 86

The memory for the MIT server : vmstat

kthr      memory            page            disk          faults      cpu
r b w   swap  free  re  mf pi po fr de sr m0 m1 m2 m3   in   sy   cs us sy id
0 0 0 180243376 184123896 81 786 248 15 15 0 0 3 14 -0 4 1854 7563 2072 1 1 98

df -h for MIT server:

Filesystem             Size   Used  Available Capacity  Mounted on
/dev/md/dsk/d0         7.9G   6.7G       1.1G    86%    /
/devices                 0K     0K         0K     0%    /devices
ctfs                     0K     0K         0K     0%    /system/contract
proc                     0K     0K         0K     0%    /proc
mnttab                   0K     0K         0K     0%    /etc/mnttab
swap                   171G   1.7M       171G     1%    /etc/svc/volatile
objfs                    0K     0K         0K     0%    /system/object
sharefs                  0K     0K         0K     0%    /etc/dfs/sharetab
/platform/sun4u-us3/lib/libc_psr/libc_psr_hwcap2.so.1
                       7.9G   6.7G       1.1G    86%    /platform/sun4u-us3/lib/libc_psr.so.1
/platform/sun4u-us3/lib/sparcv9/libc_psr/libc_psr_hwcap2.so.1
                       7.9G   6.7G       1.1G    86%    /platform/sun4u-us3/lib/sparcv9/libc_psr.so.1
/dev/md/dsk/d3         7.9G   6.6G       1.2G    85%    /var
swap                   6.0G    56K       6.0G     1%    /tmp
swap                   171G    40K       171G     1%    /var/run
swap                   171G     0K       171G     0%    /dev/vx/dmp
swap                   171G     0K       171G     0%    /dev/vx/rdmp
/dev/md/dsk/d5         2.0G   393M       1.5G    21%    /home
/dev/vx/dsk/appdg/oravl
                       2.0G    17M       2.0G     1%    /ora
/dev/md/dsk/d60        1.9G   364M       1.5G    19%    /apps/stats
/dev/md/dsk/d4          16G   2.1G        14G    14%    /var/crash
/dev/md/dsk/d61       1005M   330M       594M    36%    /opt/controlm6
/dev/vx/dsk/appdg/oraproductvl
                        10G   2.3G       7.6G    24%    /ora/product
/dev/md/dsk/d63        963M   1.0M       904M     1%    /var/opt/app
/dev/vx/dsk/dmldg/appsdmlsvtvl
                       1.0T   130G       887G    13%    /apps/dml/svt
/dev/vx/dsk/appdg/homeappusersvl
                        20G    19G       645M    97%    /home/app/users
/dev/vx/dsk/dmldg/appsdmlmit2vl
                        20G    66M        20G     1%    /apps/dml/mit2
/dev/vx/dsk/dmldg/datadmlmit2vl
                       1.9T   1.1T       773G    61%    /data/dml/mit2
/dev/md/dsk/d62        9.8G    30M       9.7G     1%    /usr/openv/netbackup/logs

df -h for local server :

   Filesystem             Size   Used  Available Capacity  Mounted on
/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s0       20G   7.7G        12G    40%    /
/devices                 0K     0K         0K     0%    /devices
ctfs                     0K     0K         0K     0%    /system/contract
proc                     0K     0K         0K     0%    /proc
mnttab                   0K     0K         0K     0%    /etc/mnttab
swap                   140G   1.6M       140G     1%    /etc/svc/volatile
objfs                    0K     0K         0K     0%    /system/object
fd                       0K     0K         0K     0%    /dev/fd
/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s5      9.8G   9.3G       483M    96%    /var
swap                   140G   504K       140G     1%    /tmp
swap                   140G    80K       140G     1%    /var/run
swap                   140G     0K       140G     0%    /dev/vx/dmp
swap                   140G     0K       140G     0%    /dev/vx/rdmp
/dev/dsk/c0t0d0s6      9.8G   9.4G       403M    96%    /opt
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkhome
                       2.0G    66M       1.8G     4%    /tlkhome
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser4
                        48G    26G        20G    57%    /tlkuser4
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/ST82
                       1.1G    17M       999M     2%    /ST_A_82
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser11
                        37G    37G       176M   100%    /tlkuser11
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/oravl97
                        20G    12G       7.3G    63%    /oravl97
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser5
                        32G    23G       8.3G    74%    /tlkuser5
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/mbtlkproj1
                       2.0G    18M       1.9G     1%    /mbtlkproj1
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/Oravol98
                        38G    25G        12G    68%    /oravl98
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k_new/tlkuser15
                        57G    57G         0K   100%    /tlkuser15
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/Oravol1
                        39G    16G        22G    42%    /oravl01
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/Oravol99
                        30G   8.3G        20G    30%    /oravl99
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser9
                        18G    13G       4.8G    73%    /tlkuser9
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/oravl08
                        32G    25G       6.3G    81%    /oravl08
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/oravl07
                        46G    45G       1.2G    98%    /oravl07
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/Oravol3
                       103G    90G        13G    88%    /oravl03
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k_new/tlkuser12
                        79G    79G         0K   100%    /tlkuser12
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/Oravol4
                        88G    83G       4.3G    96%    /oravl04
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/oravl999
                        10G   401M       9.0G     5%    /oravl999
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k_new/tlkuser14
                        54G    39G        15G    73%    /tlkuser14
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/Oravol2
                        85G    69G        14G    84%    /oravl02
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/sdkhome
                       1.0G    17M       944M     2%    /sdkhome
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser7
                        44G    36G       7.8G    83%    /tlkuser7
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkproj1
                       1.0G    17M       944M     2%    /tlkproj1
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser3
                        35G    29G       5.9G    84%    /tlkuser3
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser10
                        29G    29G       2.7M   100%    /tlkuser10
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/oravl05
                        30G    29G       1.2G    97%    /oravl05
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/oravl06
                        36G    34G       1.6G    96%    /oravl06
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser6
                        29G    27G       2.1G    93%    /tlkuser6
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser2
                        36G    30G       5.8G    84%    /tlkuser2
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/tlkuser1
                        66G    49G        16G    75%    /tlkuser1
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k_new/tlkuser13
                        84G    77G       7.0G    92%    /tlkuser13
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k_new/tlkuser16
                        44G    37G       6.4G    86%    /tlkuser16
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/db2
                       1.0G   593M       404M    60%    /opt/db2V8.1
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/WebSphere6029
                       3.0G   2.2G       776M    75%    /opt/WebSphere6029
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/websphere6
                       2.0G    88M       1.8G     5%    /opt/websphere6
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/wli
                       4.0G   1.4G       2.5G    36%    /opt/wli10gR3MP1
/dev/vx/dsk/eva8k/user
                       2.0G    19M       1.9G     1%    /user/telstra/history
dvcinasdm3:/oracle_cdrom/data
                       576G   576G       206M   100%    /oracle_cdrom
dvcinasdm2:/system_kits
                       822G   818G       4.2G   100%    /system_kits
dvcinasdm2:/db_share   295G   283G        13G    96%    /db_share
dvcinas2dm2:/system_data/data
                       315G   283G        32G    90%    /system_data
dvcinas2dm2:/ossinfra/data
                        49G    18G        32G    36%    /ossinfra

For local server the command : /usr/sbin/prtpicl -v | egrep "devfs-path|driver-name|subsystem-id" | nawk '/:subsystem-id/ { print $0; getline; print $0; getline; print $0; }' | nawk -F: '{ print $2 }' gives :

subsystem-id     0x13a1
devfs-path       /pci@0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/scsi@1
driver-name      mpt
subsystem-id     0x1648
devfs-path       /pci@0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/network@2
driver-name      bge
subsystem-id     0x1648
devfs-path       /pci@0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/network@2,1
driver-name      bge
subsystem-id     0xfc11
devfs-path       /pci@0,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0,1/SUNW,emlxs@1
driver-name      emlxs
subsystem-id     0x125e
devfs-path       /pci@3,700000/network
driver-name      e1000g
subsystem-id     0x125e
devfs-path       /pci@3,700000/network
driver-name      e1000g
subsystem-id     0x13a1
devfs-path       /pci@10,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/scsi@1
driver-name      mpt
subsystem-id     0x1648
devfs-path       /pci@10,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/network
driver-name      bge
subsystem-id     0x1648
devfs-path       /pci@10,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0/network
driver-name      bge
subsystem-id     0xfc11
devfs-path       /pci@10,600000/pci@0/pci@8/pci@0,1/SUNW,emlxs@1
driver-name      emlxs

For MIT server it gives :

subsystem-id     0xfc00
devfs-path       /pci@3d,600000/SUNW,emlxs@1
driver-name      emlxs
subsystem-id     0xfc00
devfs-path       /pci@3d,600000/SUNW,emlxs@1,1
driver-name      emlxs
subsystem-id     0xfc00
devfs-path       /pci@5d,600000/SUNW,emlxs@1
driver-name      emlxs
subsystem-id     0xfc00
devfs-path       /pci@5d,600000/SUNW,emlxs@1,1
driver-name      emlxs

on the start of i/o consuming code,iostat -d c3t50001FE1502613A9d7 5 shows :

1161  37  134    0   0    0    0   0    0  329  24    2
  3   2    3    0   0    0    0   0    0  554  71   10
195  26    6    0   0    0    0   0    0  853 108   19
 37   6    4    0   0    0    0   0    0  1134 143   10
140   8    7    0   0    0    0   0    0  3689  86    7
173  24   85    0   0    0    0   0    0  9914  74    9
  0   0    0    0   0    0    0   0    0  12323 114    2
 13   9   41    0   0    0    0   0    0  10609 117    2
  0   0    0    0   0    0    0   0    0  10746  72    2
    sd0           sd1           sd4          ssd134
kps tps serv  kps tps serv  kps tps serv  kps tps serv
  1   0    3    0   0    0    0   0    0  11376 137    2
  2   0   10    0   0    0    0   0    0  11980 157    3
231  39   14    0   0    0    0   0    0  10584 140    3
785 175    5    0   0    0    0   0    0  13503 170    2
  9   4   32    0   0    0    0   0    0  11597 168    2
  7   1    6    0   0    0    0   0    0  11555 106    2

On the MIT server iostat shows :

0.0  460.4    0.0 4029.2  0.4  0.6    0.9    1.2   2  11 c6t5006048452A79BD6d206
0.0  885.2    0.0 8349.3  0.5  0.8    0.6    0.9   3  24 c4t5006048452A79BD9d206
0.0  660.0    0.0 5618.8  0.5  0.7    0.7    1.0   2  18 c6t5006048452A79BD6d206
0.0  779.1    0.0 7408.6  0.3  0.7    0.4    0.8   2  21 c4t5006048452A79BD9d206
0.0  569.8    0.0 4893.9  0.3  0.5    0.5    1.0   2  15 c6t5006048452A79BD6d206
0.0  521.5    0.0 5433.6  0.2  0.5    0.3    0.9   1  16 c4t5006048452A79BD9d206
0.0  362.8    0.0 3134.8  0.2  0.4    0.6    1.1   1  10 c6t5006048452A79BD6d206

So,we can see that the kps for local server is much more than that of MIT server,during the time of max i/o operations.

share|improve this question
    
We face the same issue many times and most of the time it is due to OS and hardware architecture limitations! Solaris has slow I/O while Linux has faster I/O. Have not found a great answer to this :( – Narendra Pathai Dec 5 '12 at 7:09
    
But in this case both are solaris OS only...i am thinking there are some OS depenedent paramteres which is causing this.. – subodh1989 Dec 5 '12 at 7:23
    
What is the configuration of the file system on these machines? Are you writing to local disk on your desktop, but to a network share on the server? The df command and/or mount might give you the necessary information. – Andrew Alcock Dec 10 '12 at 1:54
    
i have added the df output for both the servers.Can you look and it if jvm configuration for both is different,coz i am not able to get that from the output. – subodh1989 Dec 10 '12 at 8:32
    
Thanks for the df output. In which directory/directories does the Java application write the files - I'll need the answer for BOTH the development and server. Thanks. – Andrew Alcock Dec 10 '12 at 9:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Conclusions on the local and MIT server

A quick glance at your machines:

  • Local server is a small-chassis Sun Enterprise machine on SPARC VI, possibly a M4000. You are writing data on an external file system (called eva8k_new) over multipathed PCIe slots using a direct SCSI connection. This machine is 3-5 years old.
  • MIT server is a SunFire 15000 - an old, mainframe-class Solaris server. It has 12 dual-core UltraSPARC IV+ CPUs in the hardware partition that you are running in (the physical chassis can be logically split into several different hardware partitions which cannot see each other at all). You are writing to a SAN over a 1Gb/s or 2Gb/s fibre channel (the LUN might be called dmldg) on multipathed PCI slots. This machine is at least 7 years old, but the technology is 10 years old.
  • The storage system used on the local and MIT servers are both external. The performance of the storage is dependent on a number of factors including the I/O speed of the physical interface (PCI vs. PCIe) and the interconnect (1 or 2Gb/s fibre channel on the SunFire). This article explains how to get this information.

Theoretical performance problems

The performance of your application may be gated on one of several bottlenecks (assuming no code problems and network latencies/bottlenecks):

  1. CPU: If your CPU were faster, you could get the application to go faster.
    • Single-threaded: Some applications are bottlenecked on a single thread, and so adding threads/cores does not improve performance.
    • Multi-thread capable: Sometimes, if the application is multi-threaded, adding more threads/cores can improve performance
  2. Storage IO bandwidth or IOPS: The application is reading from or writing to storage system (including disks). Adding disks, changing RAID type, adding disk cache and other things may improve IO or IOPS; alternatively you might change to another storage subsystem.
    • IO bandwidth is the maximum amount of data that can pass in a given second, which may saturate first if streaming data to or from a disk
    • IOPS (IO operations per second) is the maximum number of IO commands (read or write) that can be processed per second. Typically this saturates first for processes that are searching for or in files, or (re)writing small chunks.

Looking at your issue, we can do a quick check:

  1. If the issue is CPU, then:
    • You should see the CPU utilisation for the java process in top to be very high during program execution (90-99%)
    • The problem is not likely threading, because the SunFire MIT Server has a good number of cores available, therefore the problem is single-thread performance.
    • The UltraSPARC IV+ is quite a lot slower than the SPARC VI's. This is easily a noticeable drop, so this might be the reason the MIT server is slower
  2. If the issue is IO, then:
    • You will see the CPU utilization for the java process in top to be low (probably 50% or lower, but possibly as high as 80% or so as a rule of thumb)
    • You will see the IO to the disk subsystem using iostat saturate - that is immediately rise to a fixed number and not really 'peak' over this number. The following options might be useful: iostat -d <disk> 5. The throughput value and number of operations/sec will be higher on the local server, and lower on the MIT server
    • You need to speak to the administrator to see if a faster storage system is available for the MIT server.

All the above is assuming that other processes on the servers are not interfering with the operation of your program - clearly another high-cpu process or one writing a lot to the same disk will affect the performance greatly.

Conclusions

From the CPU data you provide, there is no evidence of a CPU bottleneck.

From the iostat data you provide, as you comment, the IO on the SunFire is significantly below that of the local server. This is likely the result of the attached storage, namely at least one of:

  • Lower performance of PCI vs. PCIe in the local server
  • Probable 1Gb/s fibre channel slower than the (possibly faster) SCSI attached storage on the local server
  • Older and slower disks on the SunFire vs. the local attached storage

(Note that the same SAN appears connected to the local server, so this could be tested).

With clear evidence of a hardware being the cause of the performance difference, there is little that can be done.

Some things may improve the general performance of the application, though. It's a good idea to run a Java profiler on the application. Examples include Netbeans and JProfiler.

The profiler will identify which IO operations are the problem. You might be able to:

  1. Generally improve the algorithm at the bottleneck
  2. Use a caching layer to aggregate multiple write operations before writing once
  3. If using the original Java I/O clases (in java.io), you could rewrite the application to use Java NIO

EDIT: Thoughts on a caching layer

Assumption: That the problematic IO operation is either repeatedly writing small chunks to disk and flushing them, or keeps performing random-access write-to-disk operations. Your application may already be streaming to disk efficiently, in which case caching would not be useful.

When you have an expensive or slow operation in an application, you will want to minimize the number of times it is invoked - ideally to the theoretical minimum which hopefully is 1. However your code may not be doing so - for example you are using an OutputStream and writing small chunks to it and flushing to disk. In this case, you may write each disk block (8k) many times, each time with just a little more data.

Instead, you could use a RAM cache to consolidate all the writes; when you know there will be no more writes to the block, then you write it exactly once to disk. For streaming, Java has the BufferedOutputStream for this for simplistic cases. When you obtain the FileOutputStream instance from the File, wrap the FileOutputStream in the BufferedOutputStream and use only the BufferedOutputStream.

If, however, you are performing true random-access writes (eg using a java.io.RandomAccessFile), and moving the file pointer with RandomAccessFile.seek(), you may want to consider writing a write cache in RAM. Precisely what this would look like depends wholly on your file data structure, but you might want to start with a block paging mechanism. Chapter 1 of Java NIO has an introduction to those concepts, but hopefully you either don't need to go there or you find a close match in the NIO API.

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i will check these things tomorrow..thanks!! – subodh1989 Dec 10 '12 at 11:03
    
The most important thing right now is to differentiate between a CPU bottleneck and an storage IO/IOPS bottleneck. – Andrew Alcock Dec 11 '12 at 0:12
    
i have added few more details. – subodh1989 Dec 11 '12 at 8:59
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You are right.On checking the iostat option i saw that the writing operation for MIT server is very slow compared to local server. – subodh1989 Dec 11 '12 at 9:28
    
Can you share the throughput values and IOPS for the two servers? (I'd expect maybe 10MB/s to for random writes over a 1Gb/s fibre channel to an array of fast disks in a SAN. For a newer storage solution, you would achieve multiples of that. – Andrew Alcock Dec 11 '12 at 10:54

If you are concerned about performance, I wouldn't use such an old version of Java. It's quite likely that the OS calls and native code generated for one architecture is sub-optimal. I would expect the newer architecure to suffer.

Can you compare Java 7 between these machines?

The ulimit suggest the first machine has much more resources. Which model of CPUs and how much memory do the two machines have?

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But i have tested the by changing the ulimit for stack and nofiles(descriptor) and it did not make a difference .Since the java version is same on both,and it should be independent of platform ,there shouldnt be much different time in execution of code.OR the JVM is dependent on platform also? – subodh1989 Dec 5 '12 at 9:47
    
The default ulimit size is determined by the amount of resources a machine has. Having more resources, can improve performance, but you are right that changing the ulimit doesn't change the hardware you have. ;) – Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '12 at 9:50
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cpu-world.com/CPUs/UltraSparc-IV%2B/… has 2 cores with 2 threads – Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '12 at 10:03
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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPARC64_VI is the same. Both are very old models, the Sparc VI was replaced in July 2008, but I suspect the UltraSPARC which was a previous family is even older. – Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '12 at 10:07
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Instead of installing it you can unpack it and run it from your home directory, or if you don't have space, any directory such as /tmp you can write to. That way you would have an idea if it is worth the hassle of getting it installed or not. – Peter Lawrey Dec 7 '12 at 10:02

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