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Is there a method of logically merging multiple dictionaries if they have common strings between them? Even if these common strings match between values of one dict() to a key of another?

I see a lot of similar questions on SO but none that seem to address my specific issue of relating multiple keys in "lower level files" to those in higher keys/values(level1dict)

Say we have:

level1dict = { '1':[1,3], '2':2 }
level2dict = { '1':4, '3':[5,9], '2':10 }
level3dict = { '1':[6,8,11], '4':12, '2':13, '3':[14,15], '5':16, '9':17, '10':[18,19,20]}
finaldict = level1dict

When I say logically I mean, in level1dict 1=1,3 and in level2dict 1=4 and 3=5,9 so overall (so far) 1 = 1,3,4,5,9 (sorting not important)

The result I would like to get to is

#.update or .append or .default?
finaldict = {'1':[1,3,4,5,9,6,8,11,12,14,15,16,17] '2':[2,10,18,19,20]}

Answered: Thank you Ashwini Chaudhary and Abhijit for the networkx module.

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What have you tried? –  BrenBarn Dec 5 '12 at 7:57
    
Currently I produce lists of the values ( list=dict[keys]) for each key in a dictionary. Then I use a for loop looking at each element of those lists which checks for presence, if not append.... a problem I have ran into (in other methods) is that I can usually get the first element to append but all subsequence elements are lost. The "other methods" include .update, .default . –  jon_shep Dec 5 '12 at 8:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is a problem of connected component subgraphs and can be best determined if you want to use networkx. Here is a solution to your problem

>>> import networkx as nx
>>> level1dict = { '1':[1,3], '2':2 }
>>> level2dict = { '1':4, '3':[5,9], '2':10 }
>>> level3dict = { '1':[6,8,11], '4':12, '2':13, '3':[14,15], '5':16, '9':17, '10':[18,19,20]}
>>> G=nx.Graph()
>>> for lvl in level:
    for key, value in lvl.items():
        key = int(key)
        try:
            for node in value:
                G.add_edge(key, node)
        except TypeError:
            G.add_edge(key, value)


>>> for sg in nx.connected_component_subgraphs(G):
    print sg.nodes()


[1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17]
[2, 10, 13, 18, 19, 20]
>>> 

Here is how you visualize it

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
>>> nx.draw(G)
>>> plt.show()

enter image description here

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3  
+1 for an apparently working solution, but that seems like overkill –  acjay Dec 5 '12 at 8:14
    
@acjohnson55: Its not considering OP failed to realize the problem. What you are trying to solve is a connected component subgraph. Either you adopt an algorithm widely available or use networkx –  Abhijit Dec 5 '12 at 8:16
    
In all really this data is clustering of biological samples. So the formation of visual clusters is very appealing to me. Will this method take strings instead of numeric numbers? e.g. 1 would equal 'DEX19.h_1273' ? –  jon_shep Dec 5 '12 at 8:17
    
@jon_sheep: Yes, but you should be consistent with node nomenclature –  Abhijit Dec 5 '12 at 8:18
    
@abhijit, alright I will give it a shot. All nodes would be strings in the real data set. I am currently using python 2.7.3 is this networkx module available to me? –  jon_shep Dec 5 '12 at 8:19

A couple of notes:

  1. It's not convenient that some values are numbers and some are lists. Try converting numbers to 1-item lists first.
  2. If the order is not important, you'll be better off using sets instead of lists. They have methods for all sorts of "logical" operations.

Then you can do:

In [1]: dict1 = {'1': {1, 3}, '2': {2}}

In [2]: dict2 = {'1': {4}, '2': {10}, '3': {5, 9}}

In [3]: dict3 = {'1': {6, 8, 11}, '2': {13}, '4': {12}}

In [4]: {k: set.union(*(d[k] for d in (dict1, dict2, dict3)))
    for k in set.intersection(*(set(d.keys()) for d in (dict1, dict2, dict3)))}
Out[4]: {'1': set([1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 11]), '2': set([2, 10, 13])}
share|improve this answer
    
I understand this, but I can't fight what my biological pipeline produces :( However, I will look into sets –  jon_shep Dec 5 '12 at 8:07
    
@jon_shep My suggestion is to do some preliminary conversion first and then apply the straightforward set methods. –  Lev Levitsky Dec 5 '12 at 8:09
    
That's well done, but it's hardly straightforward... –  acjay Dec 5 '12 at 8:10
    
I could do this, but my true data set is of 100,000 uniq IDs that over 3 files (hence the three dictionaries) gets narrowed down to only 15 ids in "level1dict". So I think applying this method would be a pain on my rather large dataset. –  jon_shep Dec 5 '12 at 8:13
    
@acjohnson55 It looks a little complex because I stuffed everything in a dict comprehension, but the logic behind it is simple. Maybe the command can be simplified, too, suggestions are welcome. –  Lev Levitsky Dec 5 '12 at 8:17
In [106]: level1dict = { '1':[1,3], '2':2 }

In [107]: level2dict = { '1':4, '3':[5,9], '2':10 }
In [108]: level3dict = { '1':[6,8,11], '4':12, '2':13, '3':[14,15], '5':16, '9':17, '10':[18,19,20]}

In [109]: keys=set(level2dict) & set(level1dict) & set(level3dict) #returns ['1','2']
In [110]: dic={}

In [111]: for key in keys:
    dic[key]=[]
    for x in (level1dict,level2dict,level3dict):
        if isinstance(x[key],int):
            dic[key].append(x[key])
        elif isinstance(x[key],list):
            dic[key].extend(x[key])
   .....:             

In [112]: dic
Out[112]: {'1': [1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 11], '2': [2, 10, 13]}

# now iterate over `dic` again to get the values related to the items present
# in the keys `'1'` and `'2'`.

In [122]: for x in dic:
    for y in dic[x]:
        for z in (level1dict,level2dict,level3dict):
            if str(y) in z and str(y) not in dic:
                if isinstance(z[str(y)],(int,str)):
                     dic[x].append(z[str(y)])
                elif isinstance(z[str(y)],list):
                     dic[x].extend(z[str(y)])
   .....:                     

In [123]: dic
Out[123]: 
{'1': [1, 3, 4, 6, 8, 11, 5, 9, 14, 15, 12, 16, 17],
 '2': [2, 10, 13, 18, 19, 20]}
share|improve this answer
    
I am curious, when you and the answer above use this syntax: IN [x]: dict() ... OUT[y]:"literal printed dict()" What is this called / doing? I would enjoy to read up on this personally. –  jon_shep Dec 5 '12 at 8:31
    
This is IPython console, here instead of the traditional >>> you'll see IN[] and OUT[] –  Ashwini Chaudhary Dec 5 '12 at 8:34
    
Ahh, alright. I have less than a month of python under my belt. Thank you. –  jon_shep Dec 5 '12 at 8:34

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