Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following xaml;

    <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type NameSpace:Node}">
        <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
            <TextBlock Text="{Binding Item.Value}"/>
            <ContentControl Content="{Binding Item}"/>
        </StackPanel>
    </DataTemplate>

    <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type NameSpace:Item}">
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Value}" />
    </DataTemplate>

When I use the Node template to display a Node object, I get two TextBlocks which both display the same value. So far so good. The problem occurs when Item changes. When the Node class fires the INotifyPropertyChanged event, the TextBlock in the Node DataTemplate updates as expected but the TextBlock in the Item DataTemplate does not update.

How can I get the Item DataTemplate to update its bindings when the Node class fires the IPropertyChanged event?

Update It turns out the above does work for the following simple scenario;

Xaml

        <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type DataTemplateExample:Node}">
            <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                <TextBlock Text="{Binding Item.Value}"/>
                <ContentControl Content="{Binding Item}"/>
            </StackPanel>
        </DataTemplate>

        <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type DataTemplateExample:Item}">
            <TextBlock Text="{Binding Value}" />
        </DataTemplate>
    </Window.Resources>

    <Grid>
        <StackPanel Orientation="Vertical">
            <ContentControl Content="{Binding MyNode}"/>
            <Button Command="{Binding ChangeMyNodeItem}">Change Item</Button>
        </StackPanel>
    </Grid>
</Window>

c#

public class MainViewModel
{
    private readonly Node myNode;
    private readonly DelegateCommand changeMyNodeItemCmd;

    public MainViewModel()
    {
        myNode = new Node {Item = new Item("a")};
        changeMyNodeItemCmd = new DelegateCommand(()=>
            myNode.Item = new Item("b"));
    }

    public Node MyNode { get { return myNode; } }

    public ICommand ChangeMyNodeItem
    {
        get { return changeMyNodeItemCmd; }
    }
}

public class Node : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private Item item;
    public Item Item
    {
        set
        {
            item = value;
            if (PropertyChanged != null)
                PropertyChanged(this,new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Item"));
        }
        get { return item; }
    }
}

public class Item
{
    private readonly string value;

    public Item(string value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public string Value
    {
        get { return value; }
    }
}

In my real scenario I was using proxies, and I think this is what was getting WPF confused. Item was not actually changing - it was being remapped.

Ultimately I solved the problem using a solution similar to what ShadeOfGray proposed. But I should point out that this is not necessary unless you are using proxies.

share|improve this question
    
I assume that you already have INotifyPropertyChanged ion your Item class in order to see the value changes. Are you also implementing INotifyPropertyChanged on your node class? If not the the ContentControl will stay bound to the old Item. –  AlSki Dec 5 '12 at 9:06
    
I have implemented INotifyPropertyChanged in my Node class for when the Item property changes. I have not implemented INotifyPropertyChanged in my Item class because this class is immutable. The Value property never changes for a specific instance of Item. It is the node class that is mutable, and I would like the UI to update when Node.Item is reassigned. –  knick Dec 5 '12 at 9:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From what you have posted I think you're firing the NotifyPropertyChanged in the wrong class. Something like that should work properly in your scenario.

Updated according to the comment:

public class Node : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private Item item;

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public Item Item
    {
        get
        {
            return item;
        }

        set
        {
            item = value;

            this.NotifyPropertyChanged("Item");

            if (item != null)
            {
                item.ForcePropertyChanged("Value");
            }
        }
    }

    protected void NotifyPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

public class Item : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private string itemValue;

    public Item()
    {
        this.Value = string.Empty;
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public string Value
    {
        get
        {
            return itemValue;
        }

        set
        {
            itemValue = value;

            NotifyPropertyChanged("Value");
        }
    }

    public void ForcePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }

    protected void NotifyPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. The code you have posted covers the scenario where the Value property is directly changed... eg: myNode.Item.Value = newValue; The scenario I am interested in is where the Value is indirectly changed, by reassigning the parent... eg: myNode.Item = new Item { Value = newValue }; –  knick Dec 5 '12 at 9:00
    
Yes, that changes things a bit :). I've updated my answer. –  ShadeOfGrey Dec 5 '12 at 9:23
    
Yeah that looks like a potential solution - thanks! I was hoping WPF might have been smart enough to take care of this for me, but I'll use this solution if there's no way to do it in the xaml. My Item class is actually immutable, so making it fire INotifyPropertyChanged events doesn't feel quite right. –  knick Dec 5 '12 at 9:45
    
One more thing. If the collection of Node objects is ObservableCollection you can remove the ForcePropertyChanged property completely. –  ShadeOfGrey Dec 5 '12 at 9:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.