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So i think im closer here but im still getting funny results when printing the reversed string in place. I'll try to be detailed.

Here is the input:

Writing code in c
is fun

Here is what i want:

c in code Writing
fun is

Here is the actual output:

C
 in code Writing
fun
 is

Here is my code:

char str[1000];  /*making array large. I picked 1000 beacuse it'll never be written over.  A line will never hole 1000 characters so fgets won't write into memory where it doesnt belong*/

int reverse(int pos)
{
    int strl = strlen(str)-1,i;
    int substrstart = 0,substrend = 0;
    char temp;

    for(;;)
    {
            if( pos <= strl/2){    /*This will allow the for loop to iterate to the middle of the string. Once the middle is reached you no longer need to swap*/ 
                    temp = str[pos];        /*Classic swap algorithm where you move the value of the first into a temp variable*/
                    str[pos]= str[strl-pos]; /*Move the value of last index into the first*/
                    str[strl-pos] = temp;   /*move the value of the first into the last*/
            }

            else
            break;
    pos++;  /*Increment your position so that you are now swaping the next two indicies inside the last two*/
    }       /* If you just swapped index 5 with 0 now you're swapping index 4 with 1*/


    for(;substrend-1 <= strl;)
    {
    if(str[substrend] == ' ' || str[substrend] == '\0' ) /*in this second part of reverse we take the now completely reversed*/ 
            {
            for(i = 0; i <= ((substrend-1) - substrstart)/2; i++)       /*Once we find a word delimiter we go into the word and apply the same swap algorthim*/
                    {
                    temp = str[substrstart+i];              /*This time we are only swapping the characters in the word so it looks as if the string was reversed in place*/
                    str[substrstart+i] = str[(substrend-1)-i]; 
                    str[(substrend-1)-i] = temp;
                    }
    if(str[substrend] == '\t' || str[substrend] == '\n')
    {
    str[substrend] = ' ';   
     for(i = 0; i <= ((substrend-1) - substrstart)/2; i++)      /*Once we find a word delimiter we go into the word and apply the same swap algorthim*/
                    {
                    temp = str[substrstart+i];              /*This time we are only swapping the characters in the word so it looks as if the string was reversed in place*/
                    str[substrstart+i] = str[(substrend-1)-i]; 
                    str[(substrend-1)-i] = temp;
                    }
    }   
            if(str[substrend] == '\0')
            {
                    break;
            }
            substrstart=substrend+1;
            }
    substrend++;    /*Keep increasing the substrend until we hit a word delimiter*/
    }
printf("%s\n", str);   /*Print the reversed line and then jump down a line*/
   return 0;
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{

char *filename;  /*creating a pointer to a filename*/
FILE *file20;   /*creating FIlE pointer to a file to open*/
int n;
int i;

if (argc==1) /*If there is no line parameter*/
{
printf("Please use line parameter!\n");
return(5); /*a return of 5 should mean that now line parameter was given*/
}

if(argc>1){
for(i=1; i < argc; i++)
{
filename = argv[i]; //get first line parameter
file20 = fopen(filename, "r"); //read text file, use rb for binary

    if (file20 == NULL){
    printf("Cannot open empty file!\n");
    }

    while(fgets(str, 1000, file20) != NULL) {
    reverse(0);
    }

fclose(file20);

}
return(0); /*return a value of 0 if all the line parameters were opened reveresed and closed successfully*/ 

}
}

Can anyone point me to an error in the logic of my reverse function?

share|improve this question
    
Are you supposed to reverse the whole file, or only each line in the file? –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 5 '12 at 8:10
    
His example suggests that he needs to reverse the whole file, i.e. the first word becomes the last one, and the first line becomes the last one (but reversed, of course) –  lmontrieux Dec 5 '12 at 10:15
    
So how's your project coming along? Did you get it to work? –  phonetagger Dec 6 '12 at 6:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you've written reads out the whole file into a single buffer and runs your reverse function over the whole file at once.

If you want the first line reversed then the next line reversed, etc, you'll need to read the lines one at a time using something like fgets. Run reverse over each line, one at a time and you should get what you want.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstdio/fgets/

share|improve this answer
    
Got my program working using your suggestion. Thanks for pointing me in the write direction. –  user1822789 Dec 7 '12 at 23:14
    
good on you! congratulations –  xaxxon Dec 8 '12 at 5:18

Assuming you want to continue reading in the whole file into a single buffer and then doing the line-by-line reverse on the buffer all at once (instead of reading in one line, reversing it, reading in the next line, reversing it, and so on), you'll need to re-write your reverse() algorithm.

What you have in place seems to work already; I think you can get what you need by adding another loop around your existing logic, with a few modifications to your existing logic. Start with a pointer to the beginning of str[], let's call it char* cp1 = str. At the top of this new loop, create another pointer, char* cp2, and set it equal to cp1. Using cp2, scan to the end of the current line looking for a newline or '\0'. Now you have a pointer to the start of the current line (cp1) and a pointer to the end of the current line (cp2). Now modify your existing logic to use those pointers instead of str[] directly. You can compute the length of the current line by simply lineLen = cp2 - cp1; (you wouldn't want to use strlen() because the line might not have a terminating '\0'). After that, it will loop back up to the top of your new loop and continue with the next line (if *cp2 doesn't point to '\0')... just set cp1 = cp2+1 and continue with the next line.

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