Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this selector:

$("table.details tbody tr:not(.details)")

But I'm wondering why this inner table gets selected too:

<table class="items details">
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <th style="width: 90%;">Test application</th>
            <th style="width: 10%;">Sent to test</th>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>6456</td>
            <td>8/29/2009</td>
        </tr>
        <tr class="details">
            <td colspan="2">
                <table>
                    <tr>
                        <td style="width: 100px;">Description:</td>
                        <td>2312313</td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td colspan="2"></td>
                    </tr>
                    <tr>
                        <td>Test URL Test</td>
                        <td><a href="Test2" title="Visit test application">Test2</a></td>
                    </tr>     
                </table>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

A .length property returns 6, which is the number of in total.

But WHY?

share|improve this question
    
Does the whole table gets selected or just a TR of this table? –  jantimon Sep 3 '09 at 7:23
    
Just the TRs gets selected –  Kordonme Sep 3 '09 at 7:26
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You selector is selecting all descendents. To select the immediate children, use this:

$("table.details > tbody > tr:not(.details)")

This section in the jQuery docs will help more: http://docs.jquery.com/Selectors

share|improve this answer
    
Tried that few seconds after posting, but .length still returns 6 and it's now working. –  Kordonme Sep 3 '09 at 7:26
4  
should be $("table.details > tbody > tr:not(.details)") –  redsquare Sep 3 '09 at 7:27
    
Exactually! This fixed it. And i looked at the DOM being generated and correct, the inner table gets a tbody, too. Like Blixt said. –  Kordonme Sep 3 '09 at 7:32
    
Thanks @redsquare. Modified my post to reflect this. –  James Wiseman Sep 3 '09 at 7:32
add comment

Your selector matches the sub-table's <tr>s - you need to change it to select direct children instead of descendants:

$("table.details > tbody > tr:not(.details)")

A <tbody> element is implied if a <tr> is inside <tbody>, <thead> or <tfoot>, so you also need the <tr>s to be direct descendants of the first <tbody>.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Because you have more rows that match the selector criteria. You would need to set the details class on all of your inner table rows if you don't want them selected.

This should be closer to what you want:

$("table.details tbody tr:first");
share|improve this answer
    
But he might not want just the first row, and any traversing using the nextSibling() method could well be wrong. –  James Wiseman Sep 3 '09 at 7:31
    
This would give me only one TR :( –  Kordonme Sep 3 '09 at 7:31
    
Yeah I must have misunderstood something - you said you didn't want nested rows and you don't want the thead row... –  Andy Gaskell Sep 3 '09 at 7:48
add comment

Think of spaces between selectors as wildcards:

table.details * tbody * tr:not(.details)

This should help you understand why the inner-table is being selected. To avoid this, use the solutions posted above that use the ">" immediate-descendant qualifier.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.