Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using @"df -lH | grep \"/Volumes/*\" | awk '{$1=$2=$3=$4=$5=$6=$7=$8\"\"; print $0 }'" for getting locally-mounted volumes path. but if volume name contain two or more space (Leopard 1). its(awk) removing space from output.

Output:

$df -lH

Filesystem     Size   Used  Avail Capacity  Mounted on
/dev/disk0s3    81G    61G    19G    77%    /
/dev/disk0s2    81G    72G   8.2G    90%    /Volumes/Leopard  1  2     3
/dev/disk0s4   158G    47G   111G    30%    /Volumes/Backup  

$ df -lH | grep "/Volumes/*"
/dev/disk0s2    81G    72G   8.2G    90%    /Volumes/Leopard  1  2     3
/dev/disk0s4   158G    47G   111G    30%    /Volumes/Backup  

$ df -lH | grep "/Volumes/*" | awk '{$1=$2=$3=$4=$5=""; print $0}'
     /Volumes/Leopard 1 2 3
     /Volumes/Backup

can anyone please help me out?

share|improve this question
    
This question would be easier if you could please post your output of df -lh –  Steve Dec 6 '12 at 7:16
    
@steve output is updated. –  Parag Bafna Dec 6 '12 at 7:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

By default awk's output field separator is a single space. So the output of your awk command is completely expected. To get the result you want, you'll need to use some sort of regex, so try this instead with GNU awk:

df -lH | awk '/Volumes/ { sub(/^(\S+\s+){5}/, ""); print }'

Or if you have GNU sed:

df -lH | sed -nr '/Volumes/s/^(\S+\s+){5}//p'

Results:

/Volumes/Leopard  1  2     3
/Volumes/Backup  

EDIT:

I see that BSD/OSX awk doesn't support interval expressions unfortunately. Therefore the safest way would be to do this with awk:

df -lH | awk '/Volumes/ { sub(/^[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +/, ""); print }'

or with sed:

df -lH | sed -n '/Volumes/s/^[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+//p'

This should also be highly portable! HTH.

EDIT:

For Mac OSX 10.8 with 8 columns, simply extend the regex:

df -lH | awk '/Volumes/ { sub(/^[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +/, ""); print }'

or with sed:

df -lH | sed -n '/Volumes/s/^[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+[^ ]\+ \+//p'
share|improve this answer
    
first command is giving me /dev/disk0s2 81G 72G 8.2G 90% /Volumes/Leopard 3 4 4 /dev/disk0s4 158G 47G 111G 30% /Volumes/Backup output –  Parag Bafna Dec 6 '12 at 9:05
    
@ParagBafna: Please see the update. HTH. –  Steve Dec 6 '12 at 10:21
1  
Thank you @steve –  Parag Bafna Dec 6 '12 at 10:24
    
@ParagBafna: No problem; I've added a sed solution too. Good-luck! –  Steve Dec 6 '12 at 10:29
    
your solution will work fine for 10.5 to 10.7 Mac osx but in 10.8 df output contain 8 columns. –  Parag Bafna Dec 6 '12 at 15:51

This is easier using the mount command, which has simpler output than df, and perl, which supports non-greedy matching:

:; mount | perl -pe 's/.*? on //;s/ \([^\)]*\)$//'
/
/dev
/Volumes/pro Time Machine 2
/Volumes/b
/Volumes/p
/net
/home

Notice that I do have a volume mounted with spaces in the mount point.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @rob mayoff. –  Parag Bafna Dec 6 '12 at 10:28
df -lH | grep "/Volumes/*" | perl -pe 's/[^\%]*\%//g'

if you want to do it in awk:

df -lH | grep "/Volumes/*"|awk '{gsub(/[^\%]*\%/,"");print}'
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you...... –  Parag Bafna Dec 6 '12 at 10:28
1  
You never need grep with awk. df -lH | awk '/\/Volumes\//{gsub(/[^%]*%/,"");print}'. I also dropped the "*" which wasn't doing anything for your RE and got rid of the backslashes before the %s as those aren't RE metacharacters so they don't need to be escaped. –  Ed Morton Dec 6 '12 at 14:31

Check the output of this command, might help you parse and get the info

mount | column -t
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, column -t will not help much, since the big problem is how to handle mount points that contain spaces. –  rob mayoff Dec 6 '12 at 7:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.