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i saw many example of Fluent style api development but some time i saw people implement fluent with interface and some time people use no interface just use straight forward class. i think people use fluent style api just due to chain of use....means easy access. so i like to know is there any other benefit of fluent api or interns of performance.

here is small code.

public class Coffee
{
    private bool _cream;

    public Coffee Make { get new Coffee(); }

    public Coffee WithCream()
    {
        _cream = true;
        return this;
    }

    public Coffee WithOuncesToServe(int ounces)
    {
        _ounces = ounces;
        return this;
    }
}

var myMorningCoffee = Coffee.Make.WithCream().WithOuncesToServe(16);
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closed as not constructive by Henk Holterman, stusmith, Barry Kaye, ArsenMkrt, Levi Botelho Dec 5 '12 at 13:31

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Hard to find the question here. 'benefits or interns or performance' ? –  Henk Holterman Dec 5 '12 at 8:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In your example, I think the syntax (i.e. the "ease of use") is the only advantage. But for example LINQ methods work differently - the methods don't return this, they return a new instance. That is obviously a performance hit, but it enables the classes to be immutable, which helps tremendously when you reason about your code, it can promote parallel computations with such classes.

Edit (example): In that case, your Coffee would look like this (although it may not be a good example, because it doesn't make much sense to me to use fluent syntax here anyway, let alone with new instances)

public class Coffee
{
    private bool _cream;
    private int _ounces;

    // I really don't like this kind of instantiation,
    // but I kept it there and made static to make it work.
    public static Coffee Make { get new Coffee(); }

    public Coffee WithCream()
    {
        return new Coffee
        {
            _cream = true,
            _ounces = this._ounces
        }
    }

    public Coffee WithOuncesToServe(int ounces)
    {
        return new Coffee
        {
            _cream = this._cream,
            _ounces = ounces
        };
    }

But of course in case of such a simple class, it is always better to use constructor with parameters, e.g.

public Coffee(int ounces, bool cream)

And as an opposite example, I remember a set of handy Dictionary extensions for adding items fluently, but without creating a new instance. Something like:

public static IDictionary<K, V> AddConditionally(
    this IDictionary<K, V> source,
    K key, V value)
{
    // Real-life implementation would contain more checks etc.
    if(!source.ContainsKey(key))
        source.Add(key, value);

    return source;
}

Which you could use to fill a dictionary with some initial data for example

var dict = new Dictionary<int, int>()
    .AddConditionally(0,1)
    .AddConditionally(1,1)
    .AddConditionally(2,1)
    .AddConditionally(3,1);
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thanks for your answer. you said it would matter the performance if we return new instance instead of this. can u please come up with such kind of fluent api as a result i can learn the good things. –  Thomas Dec 5 '12 at 8:54
    
Added some examples and more info. –  Honza Brestan Dec 5 '12 at 9:13
    
thanks....great –  Thomas Dec 5 '12 at 10:13

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