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Any better suggestions for this c functions copyString,concatString

This is a question form a job interview , I need to implement it with a specific signature this is the code I need to work:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{

    char *str = NULL;
    new_strcpy(&str , "string one");
    new_strcpy(&str , str +7);
    new_strcat(&str , " two");
    new_printf(&str , "%str !", s);
    puts(str ); 
    new_free(&str);
    return 0;
}

this is my implementation to new_strcpy:

char* new_strcpy(char **dst,const char *source)
{

  char *ans=*dst;

  while(**dst++=*source++);

  return ans;

}

But this solution crash, can someone help me ?

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marked as duplicate by ecatmur, Steve Jessop, Jason Heine, esqew, ЯegDwight Dec 5 '12 at 23:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
**dst++ use parentheses for everyone sake. –  UmNyobe Dec 5 '12 at 9:17
3  
"This is a question form a job interview" -- sorry, but you should not have told them you know C. –  Steve Jessop Dec 5 '12 at 9:43
    
maybe the interviewee mentions the benefits of code re-use and how one should aim to allocate and free heap memory in the same scope rather than offsetting them by reinventing existing functions in a less elegant form (in other words its not a very good interview question) –  bph Dec 5 '12 at 10:00

1 Answer 1

The problem with your solution is that you fail to allocate memory for *dst.

Consider the first three lines of the code that needs to work:

char *str = NULL;
new_strcpy(&str , "string one");
new_strcpy(&str , str +7);         // ***

From this, it is clear that:

  1. new_strcpy() needs to allocate memory for the result.
  2. When allocating str anew, new_strcpy() needs to deallocate the previous str to avoid leaking memory.
  3. To make line *** above work, the deallocation has to happen after the allocation.

Here is a skeleton implementation to give you the idea. I implement the functions in terms of strcpy() et al, but if calling the library function is not permissible, you can write your own loops (you already know how to do that).

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

void new_strcpy(char** dst, const char* src) {
    char* orig_dst = *dst;
    *dst = malloc(strlen(src) + 1);
    strcpy(*dst, src); /* replace with a loop if calling strcpy() is not permissible */
    free(orig_dst);
}

void new_strcat(char** dst, const char* src) {
    char* orig_dst = *dst;
    *dst = malloc(strlen(*dst) + strlen(src) + 1);
    strcpy(*dst, orig_dst); /* replace with a loop if calling strcpy() is not permissible */
    strcat(*dst, src);      /* ditto for strcat() */
    free(orig_dst);
}

void new_free(char** dst) {
    free(*dst);
    *dst = NULL;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *str = NULL;
    new_strcpy(&str , "string one");
    new_strcpy(&str , str +7);
    new_strcat(&str , " two");
/*    new_printf(&str , "%str !", s); */
    puts(str );
    new_free(&str);
    return 0;
}

I leave implementing new_printf() as an exercise for the reader. :-)

share|improve this answer
2  
I don't think this is returning a pointer to garbage land - orig_dst is free'd, dst is returned, after the call to malloc these point to different things - looks ok to me –  bph Dec 5 '12 at 9:55
1  
Is it the official troll day or something? –  NPE Dec 5 '12 at 10:19
1  
Ok so it doesn't return a garbage pointer, but it assumes that it gets a pointer to dynamic memory, and then returns an allocated chunk of memory which isn't going to be freed unless you call a custom free function. The code is so obscure I don't see how it would be of any use in a real world application. A sane implementation would be similar to strdup. –  Lundin Dec 5 '12 at 10:25
1  
I guess the interviewer want to see if the candidate can handle heap memory and can use pointer the right way. Its not the question if this is a real world problem. For example I would let pass the candidate if he/she is able to give the right ideas. No need to write the code untile the end. –  Fermat2357 Dec 5 '12 at 10:29
1  
@NPE. You are right, the free does not cause loose of the new malloc because it free the old buffer. –  MOHAMED Dec 5 '12 at 10:31

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