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I have the following string output:

"[1, 2, 3, *, +, 4, 5, -, /]"

How can I symbolize the non-digits characters (i.e. *, +, -, /) and return the following result:

[1, 2, 3, :*, :+, 4, 5, :-, :/]

Currently, I'm using this method to convert the string:

def tokens(str)
    new_str = str.split(/\s+/)
    clean_str = new_str.to_s.gsub(/"/, '')
            #Symbolise clean_str to desired output
end
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
str = "[1, 2, 3, *, +, 4, 5, -, /]"

str.scan(/[^\[\]\s,]+/)
# => ["1", "2", "3", "*", "+", "4", "5", "-", "/"]

str.scan(/[^\[\]\s,]+/).map {|t| Integer(t) rescue t.to_sym }
# => [1, 2, 3, :*, :+, 4, 5, :-, :/]
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Thanks for the help, Lars! –  bigthyme Dec 5 '12 at 17:29
eval(str.gsub(/(?<=\[| )(?=\D)/, ":"))
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2  
gasp! ... eval() ? –  maček Dec 5 '12 at 10:09
    
This answer also worked, but I think the marked answer was easier to read. Thanks! –  bigthyme Dec 5 '12 at 17:30

You can create a boolean method returning true if the current string is numeric, or false otherwise. So basically, you can do this :

class String
  def numeric?
    Float(self) != nil rescue false
  end
end

"3".numeric?
#=> true
"+".numeric?
#=> false
"a".numeric?
#=> false
"-3".numeric?
#=> true

Then, you can iterate over your list (through each() for instance ) and replace the current String (say a) with :a if numeric? returns false on it. For this, you have to use the to_sym() method.

There may be faster way to do this, but I think the numeric?() boolean function is pretty handsome.

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You really don't need to duck punch String to get the desired result. Don't encourage this practice for something so trivial. –  maček Dec 5 '12 at 9:31
    
@macek : "There is more than one way to do it". I get the result using my method, you get one using a block, great. That's why I love Ruby, you can do it the way you want. –  NNzz Dec 5 '12 at 9:33
    
Just because you can do it, doesn't mean you should. This is what sets best practices apart from... not best practices... –  maček Dec 5 '12 at 9:34
1  
It's not your method. You copied/pasted it from here. Please add the source to your answer next time. –  Mischa Dec 5 '12 at 9:36
1  
@Mischa : Thanks for the link, didn't know it. Great minds think alike it seems. And seeing when this thread has been posted, I guess I use this method for a longer time than the poster ;). But well, that's off-topic. –  NNzz Dec 5 '12 at 9:41

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