Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Variable functions in Java

Can we return functions in java like we can return in python. because in java also everything is object except primitives, and in python everything is object (modules, functions and every data type)

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by dystroy, Donal Fellows, Mark, kazanaki, Joachim Sauer Dec 5 '12 at 12:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
"...because in java also everything is object except primitives..." That's not quite true, and in particular, methods (functions) are not yet first class objects. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 5 '12 at 9:50
    
For today's java, you typically use interfaces. –  dystroy Dec 5 '12 at 9:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No currently not but it is scheduled for a later Java release (JDK 8): Project Lambda.

share|improve this answer
    
bold thanks –  tailor_raj Dec 5 '12 at 9:52
    
is it ? can you give any reference –  vels4j Dec 5 '12 at 9:53
    
@vels4j see the link in the answer "JSR 335 is part of JSR 337 (Java SE 8)" –  user714965 Dec 5 '12 at 9:55
    
Well, you can use interfaces to get essentially the same result (just a lot more verbose than with lambda expressions). See my reply. –  Anony-Mousse Dec 5 '12 at 16:27
    
This was slated for JDK 7 and delayed once already. –  NullUserException Dec 5 '12 at 16:37

Yes, but you need to define an interface for the function.

Obviously, there can be functions with very different signatures, and you need to define a way how to invoke the function that was returned.

Essentially, Runnable, Future etc. in Java are such things. And one may argue that the Method object you can get for any Java method via reflection also is such a thing, too.

A simple example:

public interface DoubleDoubleFunction {
   double compute(double input);
}

// in python:
// def squarefunction(input):
//      return input * input
public class SquareFunction implements DoubleDoubleFunction {
    @Override
    public double compute(double input) {
        return input * input;
    }
};

public DoubleDoubleFunction getFunction() {
    // in python: return squarefunction
    return new SquareFunction();
}

public DoubleDoubleFunction getOtherFunction() {
    // Also works with anonymous functions:
    // In python, this would be:
    // return lambda input: math.sqrt(input)
    return new DoubleDoubleFunction() {
        @Override
        public double compute(double input) {
            return Math.sqrt(input);
        }
    };
}

A real world example: Apache Mahout math "DoubleFunction" interface

Java 8 is expected to bring Lambda functions (this was originally promised for Java 7 already). There are also details on how these will be rewritten into Java bytecode.

I believe that in many situations, the "traditional" way will still remain cleaner and more performant (in particular when involving primitives and in numerical computations). It actually is quite straightforward and can be optimized well by the Hotspot VM.

share|improve this answer

Not yet, as user714965 points out it's coming in JDK 8.

Until then, use interfaces, possibly in combination with anonymous classes. If you really want to be completely free and open, you can use anonymous classes with reflection instead of interfaces, returning a Method object for one of your anonymous class's methods, which the calling code can invoke later. But usually interfaces are sufficient.

share|improve this answer

You could use a reflection based wrapper for method invocations. I tried to create a very simply example of the basic idea.

import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.math.BigDecimal;
import java.math.RoundingMode;

public class CallableFunction {
    Object  obj;

    Method  m;

    static CallableFunction create( Object obj, String methodName, Class<?>... argTypes) {
        Method m = null;
        try {
            m = obj.getClass().getMethod( methodName, argTypes );
        }
        catch( Exception e ) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }
        CallableFunction f = new CallableFunction();
        f.obj = obj;
        f.m = m;
        return f;
    }

    Object invoke( Object... args) {
        try {
            return m.invoke( obj, args );
        }
        catch( Exception e ) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return null;
    }

    public static void main( String[] args) {
        BigDecimal test = new BigDecimal( Math.PI );

        CallableFunction cf = create( test, "setScale", int.class, RoundingMode.class );
        Object result = cf.invoke( 2, RoundingMode.HALF_UP );

        System.out.println( "test=" + test + " result=" + result );
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This simulates something similar to Lambdas ... (you'll need a little more casting if you use anything other than Strings, but I'm keeping the example brief) ...

public class MyTest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Lambda l = new Lambda() { public Object func(Object x) {
                        return "Hello " + x; } };

        System.out.println(l.func("Bob"));
        System.out.println(nowTryFromMethod(l));
        System.out.println((new Lambda() { public Object func(Object x) {
                              return "Goodbye " + x; } }).func("Harry"));
    }

    private static Object nowTryFromMethod(Lambda l) {
            return l.func("Jerry");
    }
}

class Lambda {

    public Object func(Object x) { return null; }
}

Output:

Hello Bob
Hello Jerry
Goodbye Harry
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.