Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have attempted to implement the dynamic programming approach to finding the longest common sub sequence between two sequences. My algorithm works when the two strings that are being compared are the same lengths, but when the second string is longer than the first, my LCSLength() function does not return the correct value.

Here is code with a test case that returns the wrong value.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

int LCSLength(string X,string Y);

int main()
{
    string first ("HELLO");
    string second ("HLOCKKE");
    int LCS;

    //ifstream inData;
    //inData.open("test.dat");

    //inData >> first >> second;
    //inData.close();

    LCS = LCSLength(first,second);
    cout << "The LCS is: " << LCS << endl;
    cout << first << endl;
    cout << second << endl;
    return 0;
}

int LCSLength(string X,string Y)
{
    int m = X.size();
    int n = Y.size();
    int C[m][n];
    for(int i=0; i<=m; i++)
    {
        for(int j=0; j<=n; j++)
            C[i][j] = 0;
    }
    for(int i=1; i<=m; i++)
    {
        for(int j=1; j<=n; j++)
        {
            if(X[i-1]==Y[j-1])
                C[i][j]=C[i-1][j-1]+1;
            else 
                C[i][j]=max(C[i][j-1],C[i-1][j]);
       }
    }

    return C[m][n];
}

This should print "The LCS is: 3" because the LCS between my two strings is 3, however, my program does not. I can't find my error. Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question
    
I found one error - made the edit. Still not returning correct value. –  Zack Dec 5 '12 at 10:20
    
what does it return? And why are you expecting 3? I the longest common part I can see is LO which is 2 –  user1773602 Dec 5 '12 at 10:23
    
I'm expecting 3 because the longest common subsequence is HLO. For this particular example, my program returns 4. –  Zack Dec 5 '12 at 10:26
    
2  
I don't see how your code supposed to work in the first place. You breach boundaries of your C[m][n] array which is an undefined behaviour –  user1773602 Dec 5 '12 at 10:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Fixed my errors using some google searches. Indexing was my problem. Here is the correct code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>


using namespace std;

int LCSLength(string X,string Y);

int main()
{
    string first ("HELLO");
    string second ("HLOCKKE");
    int LCS;

    //ifstream inData;
    //inData.open("test.dat");

    //inData >> first >> second;
    //inData.close();

    LCS = LCSLength(first,second);
    cout << "The LCS is: " << LCS << endl;
    cout << first << endl;
    cout << second << endl;
    return 0;
}

int LCSLength(string X,string Y)
{
    int m = X.size();
    int n = Y.size();
    int L[m+1][n+1];
    for(int i=0; i<=m; i++)
    {
        for(int j=0; j<=n; j++)
        {
            if(i==0 || j==0)
                L[i][j] = 0;
            else if(X[i-1]==Y[j-1])
                L[i][j] = L[i-1][j-1]+1;
            else
                L[i][j] = max(L[i-1][j],L[i][j-1]);
        }
    }
    return L[m][n];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, it's the other way around: your for loops should iterate while i<m and j<n (not "smaller or equal to"). In most C-like languages, arrays are 0-based, meaning that an array of n items has indices from 0 to n-1, inclusive. –  Groo Oct 11 '13 at 22:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.