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Let me show you what builder design pattern implementation I see in every blog:

interface IProductBuilder
{
    void BuildPart1(Part1 value);
    void BuildPart2(Part2 value);
    void BuildPart3(Part3 value);
}

class ConcreteProduct
{
    public readonly Part1 Part1;
    public readonly Part2 Part2;
    public readonly Part3 Part3;

    public ConcreteProduct(Part1 part1, Part2 part2, Part3 part3)
    {
        Part1 = part1;
        Part2 = part2;
        Part3 = part3;
    }
}

class ConcreteProductBuilder : IProductBuilder
{
    Part1 _part1;
    Part2 _part2;
    Part3 _part3;

    public void BuildPart1(Part1 value)
    {
        _part1 = value;
    }

    public void BuildPart2(Part2 value)
    {
        _part2 = value;
    }

    public void BuildPart3(Part3 value)
    {
        _part3 = value;
    }

    public ConcreteProduct GetResult()
    {
        return new ConcreteProduct(part1, part2, part3);
    }
}

A common way to unit-test builder is something like this:

[TestMethod]
void TestBuilder()
{
    var target = new ConcreteBuilder();

    var part1 = new Part1();
    var part2 = new Part2();
    var part3 = new Part3();

    target.BuildPart1(part1);
    target.BuildPart2(part2);
    target.BuildPart3(part3);

    ConcreteProduct product = target.GetResult();

    Assert.IsNotNull(product);
    Assert.AreEqual(product.Part1, part1);
    Assert.AreEqual(product.Part2, part2);
    Assert.AreEqual(product.Part3, part3);
}

So, this is a quite simple example.

I think builder pattern is a really good thing. It gives you an ability to place all mutable data in one place and leave all other classes immutable, it's cool for testability.

But what if I don't want to expose fields of Product to somebody (or I just can't do it because Product is a part of some library).

How should I unit test my builder?

It will look like this now?

[TestMethod]
void TestBuilder()
{
    var target = new ConcreteProductBuilder();

    var part1 = new Part1();
    var part2 = new Part2();
    var part3 = new Part3();

    target.BuildPart1(part1);
    target.BuildPart2(part2);
    target.BuildPart3(part3);

    ConcreteProduct product = target.GetResult();

    TestConcreteProductBehaviorInUseCase1(product);
    TestConcreteProductBehaviorInUseCase2(product);
    ...
    TestConcreteProductBehaviorInUseCaseN(product);
}

Here I see at least one simple solution - to modify ConcreteProductBuilder.GetResult to take a factory:

public ConcreteProduct GetResult(IConcreteProductFactory factory)
{
    return factory.Create(part1, part2, part3);
}

and implement IConcreteProductFactory in 2 ways:

public MockConcreteProductFactory
{
    public Part1 Part1;
    public Part2 Part2;
    public Part3 Part3;
    public ConcreteProduct Product;
    public int Calls;

    public ConcreteProduct Create(Part1 part1, Part2 part2, Part3 part3)
    {
        Calls++;

        Part1 = part1;
        Part2 = part2;
        Part3 = part3;

        Product = new ConcreteProduct(part1, part2, part3);
        return Product;
    }
}

public ConcreteProductFactory
{
    public ConcreteProduct Create(Part1 part1, Part2 part2, Part3 part3)
    {
        return new ConcreteProduct(part1, part2, part3);
    }
}

In such case test will be as simple as it was before:

[TestMethod]
void TestBuilder()
{
    var target = new ConcreteBuilder();

    var part1 = new Part1();
    var part2 = new Part2();
    var part3 = new Part3();

    target.BuildPart1(part1);
    target.BuildPart2(part2);
    target.BuildPart3(part3);

    var factory = new MockConcreteProductFactory();

    ConcreteProduct product = target.GetResult(factory);

    Assert.AreEqual(1, factory.Calls);
    Assert.AreSame(factory.Product, product);
    Assert.AreEqual(factory.Part1, part1);
    Assert.AreEqual(factory.Part2, part2);
    Assert.AreEqual(factory.Part3, part3);
}

So my question is not about how to solve it a better way but is about Builder patter itself.

Does the Builder Design Pattern violate the Single Responsibility principle?

For me it looks that builder in a common definition is responsible for:

  1. Collecting of constructor arguments (or property values in other implementation of builder pattern)
  2. Constructing object with collected properties
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2 Answers

I don't think it violates Single Responsibility Principle (SRP). Consider the example mentioned in the wiki for SRP:

Martin defines a responsibility as a reason to change, and concludes that a class or module should have one, and only one, reason to change. As an example, consider a module that compiles and prints a report. Such a module can be changed for two reasons. First, the content of the report can change. Second, the format of the report can change. These two things change for very different causes; one substantive, and one cosmetic.

But for the case that you mention, if one changes the other also has to change i.e. if there is an additional argument then the object should be constructed with this additional argument. So it's essentially 1 responsibility with 2 subtasks.

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We are dealing with two concepts here:

Is the builder pattern respecting the Single Responsibility Principle? Yes.

You might believe that the builder has two responsibilities:

  • Collecting properties
  • Creating the product based on collected properties

In fact, there is only one responsibility which is to create the product based on collected properties. You see, the class responsible for collecting properties is the Director class (see Wikipedia link). The Builder only receive the properties in a passive way. It's not really its responsibility. After receiving the properties, it builds the object.

What about the unit testing?

Well, technically, when you don't want to expose field in a pattern, it's for a reason and it's part of your core design. So it's not the "Design's" job to accommodate the unit tester. It's the unit tester job to accommodate the "Design".

You could either achieve that with reflection (Ok, that's cheating) or buy creating a mockup builder that inherits the Concrete Builder you want to test. This mockup builder would store the part it assembles and make them accessible to the unit tester.

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