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What does {{...}} block mean in the following code?

class X {
private Y var1;

    private X() {
        Z context = new Z(new SystemThreadPool()) {{
            var1 = new Y();
        }};
    }
}
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Corrected code: var1 = new Y() instead of Y = new Y(); –  Victor Sorokin Sep 3 '09 at 8:29
5  
I guess it's not easy to google for double braces. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 3 '09 at 8:52
2  
@Tom Hawtin: You can Google for "double brace" instead... –  Ates Goral Aug 10 '10 at 21:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 44 down vote accepted

It's called double curly brace initialization.

It means you're creating an anonymous subclass and the code within the double braces is basically a constructor. It's often used to add contents to collections because Java's syntax for creating what are essentially collection constants is somewhat awkward.

So you might do:

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>() {{
  add("one");
  add("two");
  add("three");
}};

instead of:

List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
list.add("one");
list.add("two");
list.add("three");

I actually don't like that and prefer to do this:

List<String> list = Arrays.asList("one", "two", "three");

So it doesn't make much sense in that case whereas it does for, say, Maps, which don't have a convenient helper.

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6  
Java7 will have "map literal" syntax, so eventually the {{ }} syntax will become obsolete. Assuming anyone actually uses Java7. I may have retired by that point. –  skaffman Sep 3 '09 at 8:46
    
@skaffman It is very useful in "fluid java" such as the JATL attempts. –  C. Ross Mar 29 '11 at 14:21
5  
Note that Arrays.asList() returns java.util.Arrays.ArrayList.ArrayList and not java.util.ArrayList, which has limited functionality. –  Asaf Jan 17 '12 at 13:03
1  
This technique is tricky and have some caveats. It is possible to end up with broken equals() contract or increased memory usage without any good reason. It's better to avoid double brace initialization unless you exactly know what you are doing. Look at this post for more details. –  Andrew Polunin Dec 25 '12 at 10:48

The "outer" braces mean that you're making an anonymous subclass, the second braces are the object initializer. The initializer is run before the class' constructor, but after any super calls (and therefore also after any superclass initializers). You can use initializers in non-anonymous classes, too, which is a convenient way to initiate final fields if you have several constructors which cannot call each other, or fields which need more complex initialization than usual field initializers allow.

Consider this class:

class X extends Y{
    private final int lulz;

    private static boolean someCondition(){...}
    private static boolean danger() throws SomeException { ... }
    public X(A a) throws SomeException {
        super(a); 
        lulz = someCondition()? danger() : 0;
    }
    public X(B b) throws SomeException {
        super(b); 
        lulz = someCondition()? danger() : 0;
    }
}

It could be rewritten as:

class X extends Y{
    private final int lulz;

    private static boolean someCondition(){...}
    private static boolean danger() throws SomeException { ... }
    { // initalizer -- might throw SomeException!
        lulz = someCondition()? danger() : 0;
    }
    public X(A a) throws SomeException { super(a); }
    public X(B b) throws SomeException { super(b); }
}

If the initializer can throw a checked exception, all constructors must declare they can throw it.

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You are creating an anonymous class and using the class Instance initializer idiom, like this:

class X {
    private Y var1;

    private X() {
        Z context = new Z(
               new SystemThreadPool()) {
                   {                        // This is the initialize idiom
                       var1 = new Y();      //
                   }                        //
               }
          );  // BTW you are missing ")"
    }
}
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As mentioned in previous answers, double curly brace initialization is correct.

It uses a specific technique to Initializing Instance Members in Java. It is a shorthand way for defining in a class definition, a shared block of code that will run when any of the class constructor is activated.

I am adding the link to the official Java documentations describing it for more broader view on the subject.

From the documentation:

Initializer blocks for instance variables look just like static initializer blocks, but without the static keyword:

{

// whatever code is needed for initialization goes here 

}

The Java compiler copies initializer blocks into every constructor. Therefore, this approach can be used to share a block of code between multiple constructors.

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It's called Object Initialization which means you're a assigning a value to Y of Z instance.

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Not in Java. It can be used similarly, but is actually much much more powerful. –  C. Ross Mar 29 '11 at 14:24

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