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PHP detecting request type (GET, POST, PUT or DELETE)

This should be an easy one.

I have a script, and in the script I want to determine whether the request arrive via GET or POST method.

What is the correct way to do it?

I am thinking of using something like this

if (isset($_POST)) {
    // do post
} else  {
    // do get
}

But deep in my heart I don't feel this is the right way. Any idea?

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marked as duplicate by Neal, tereško, hakre, SomeKittens Ux2666, PeeHaa Nov 5 '12 at 20:38

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2 Answers 2

up vote 274 down vote accepted

Better use $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD']:

if ($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] === 'POST') {
    // …
}
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27  
A triple = check would be better : $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] === 'POST' –  Cyril N. Jun 8 '12 at 7:19
4  
Why would triple = be better than double = in this case? –  Martin Konecny Jun 28 '13 at 17:27
4  
To answer the questions of @MartinKonecny and @diegoaguilar : If the $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] is indeed 'POST', it should have a string value, so you need not to convert the type. The === does not do a type conversion, while == does. Besides being the 'best practice' to use === where possible, it might even have a tiny effect on the speed of your script because it skips the type conversion. –  T.S. Nov 26 '13 at 10:35
1  
And this may be pedantic, but even better would be the Yoda-conditioned 'POST' === $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] –  Rhys Mar 12 at 17:11
1  
@FelikZ, because you writing if ($_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] = 'POST'), woudd have not modify $_SERVER['REQUEST_METHOD'] –  user457015 May 4 at 10:44
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