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I have a component that is linked to many thousands of items (in this case all the other items are components). Is there an easy/fast way to delete the component and remove all the links?

I am currently using Tridion 5.3 and and doing this programmatically via the TOM API. For one component that was linked to 10000 other components this took about 7 hours. I have many more to go!

I am in the process of migrating from R5.3 to 2011 so can use either for the task.

The code I am using is as follows...

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var componentIDToRemove = "tcm:4-123456";

    var linkedComponentIDs = System.IO.File.ReadAllLines("C:\\...\\whereused.txt"); // ids of the components linked to tcm:4-123456

    TDS.TDSE tdse = new TDS.TDSE();

    foreach (var linkedComponentID in linkedComponentIDs)
    {
        TDS.Component component = null;
        TDS.ItemFieldValues itemFieldValues = null;

        try
        {
            component = (TDS.Component)tdse.GetObject(linkedComponentID, TDSDefines.EnumOpenMode.OpenModeView);

            itemFieldValues = component.MetadataFields["myfield"].value;

            var itemFieldValuesCount = itemFieldValues.Count;
            for (var i = itemFieldValuesCount; i > 0; i--)
            {
                if (itemFieldValues[i].ID == componentIDToRemove)
                {
                    component.CheckOut();
                    itemFieldValues.Remove(i);
                    component.Save();
                    component.CheckIn();
                }
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            // release the TDS objects from memory
            ReleaseObject(component);
            ReleaseObject(itemFieldValues);
        }
    }
}

public static void ReleaseObject(object o)
{
    try
    {
        if (o != null)
        {
            System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(o);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
If you have doubt about your code, share it so we can have a look at it. –  Frank van Puffelen Dec 5 '12 at 12:28
1  
Code looks good. Maybe the DBA can monitor resources while the script is running? Running a script on the DB would be faster, but could have some unintended side-effects that would be difficult to recover from. –  robrtc Dec 5 '12 at 13:20
2  
Are the links in that component or from other components? And do you know which field to specifically check (i.e. do you need the loop?). –  Alvin Reyes Dec 5 '12 at 13:26
1  
Is it possible that your component could be linked multiple times in the metadata? If so, you will be checking-out, saving and checking-in repeatedly. Probably not the case but it may speed things up a little. It is typically the ".Save()" that takes the time for such scripts. Also consider using .Save(true) instead of checking-in each time. –  Chris Summers Dec 5 '12 at 13:38
1  
Makes sense if the "TargetAudience" components could be re-used or "templates," otherwise embeddable schemas and keywords might have been less crazy. No script I know of, but you might get a small performance gain if you know where this component normally exists and/or the authors had a convention when linking. For example, you might want to loop from 0 up to itemFieldValuesCount if the linked item is typically "higher" in the list. –  Alvin Reyes Dec 10 '12 at 4:24
show 5 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Using a script via TOM is the best way to do it. The Core Service API in Tridion 2011 is probably not much faster.

From my experience the following are best practice when using TOM via Interop in .NET.

  • Explicitly declare all objects and release them. For example:

    // do this
    var items = folder.GetItems(16);
    foreach(var item in items)
    {
        // ...
    }
    if(items != null)
    {
        Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(items);
    }
    
    // instead of this
    foreach(var item in folder.GetItems(16))
    {
        // ...
    }
    
  • If passing an object to a method - pass the URI instead of the object and declare a new instance of the object within the method and explicitly release it inside the method.

  • Declare a single instance of TDSE and reference it. Creating multiple instances is a more expensive option.

  • Where Used can take a long time and is heavy on the database. Update database indexes and run maintenance scripts before running the code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @robrtc. I have posted my code in my question. I think I'm doing everything right? Like I said to Frank, I was hoping there was a script/program I wasn't aware of. –  Kevin Brydon Dec 5 '12 at 12:52
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You appear to be triggering two garbage collections each time you process a component. This is almost certainly going to affect your performance quite a lot.

As for the TOM - most of the important things have been said by others, although I don't think anyone has mentioned that ItemField collections are incredibly slow when compared to using the XML API to do the same job. In other words, load an XmlDocument (or perhaps XDocument) using GetXml()... manipulate the XML directly, push it back in with UpdateXml() and Save.

share|improve this answer
    
Would you recommend garbage collecting just the once on the component? (maybe the itemFieldValues gets collected with the component?). Or where else would you put the garbage collection? I haven't run a profiler over my code but just stepping through, the garbage collection completes instantaneously while there is a noticeable lag in the calling the TOM API. –  Kevin Brydon Dec 5 '12 at 15:29
1  
Don't force the garbage collection at all. Let the garbage collector decide. In the time frames associated with stepping in the debugger, you won't notice the GC. –  Dominic Cronin Dec 5 '12 at 19:42
    
Ok. So there's no need to call GC.Collect(); and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();? –  Kevin Brydon Dec 5 '12 at 21:24
1  
Exactly. Those methods are exposed by GC for people writing specialist tooling and the like. You shouldn't need to call them in normal code. –  Dominic Cronin Dec 6 '12 at 8:27
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