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Type extension errors

I would like to add an extension method in F# to System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary. The trouble is that I cannot seem to get the type constraints right. I was hoping something like the following would work:

type Dictionary<'k, 'd when 'k : equality> with

   static member ofList (xs:list<'k * 'd>) : Dictionary<'k, 'd> =
       let res = new Dictionary<'k, 'd> ()
       for (k, d) in xs do
           res.Add (k, d)
       res

However, the compiler complains that my declaration differs from that of Dictionary. It does not produce that particular error when I leave out the equality constraint. But then it warns that it's missing. Many thanks for any hints, preferably other that "turn the warning level down" :-)

EDIT

Many thanks to KVB for providing the answer I wanted.

type Dictionary<'k, 'd> with

static member ofList (xs:list<'k * 'd>) : Dictionary<'k, 'd> =

    let res = new Dictionary<'k, 'd> (EqualityComparer<'k>.Default)
    for (k, d) in xs do
        res.Add (k, d)
    res

EDIT: Here is an example to better explain my reply to RJ. It shows that type arguments are optional when instantiating a type provided the compiler can infer them. It compiles without warnings or errors.

type System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<'k, 'd> with
   static member test (dict:System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<'k, 'd>) : bool =
        dict.Values |> List.ofSeq |> List.isEmpty


let test (x:System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary<'k, 'd>) =
    System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary.test x
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by kvb, Daniel, Kate Gregory, evilone, pad Dec 6 '12 at 7:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I think it's not a duplicate. The referenced post uses a normal member, whereas this question uses a static member. It is very useful in figuring out why the compiler insists on the equality constraint, but not so much when it comes to silencing the warnings without having to specify the type parameters explictly. (However, this has been the most helpful comment so far, many thanks) –  user1878761 Dec 5 '12 at 17:00
    
In both cases it's a question of how to add an extension member to the Dictionary<_,_> type, and the answer in the other question explains why you need to call a constructor overload that takes an IEqualityCompararer<_> to avoid the type constraint. –  kvb Dec 5 '12 at 17:11
1  
In your case, you can't just use this.Comparer, since you're creating a static member, but you could use EqualityComparer<_>.Default instead. –  kvb Dec 5 '12 at 17:12
    
That was kind of my point. The questions have different answers that would not be obvious to someone not familiar with EqualityComparers. Either way, I would be most happy to accept this as the answer if you can be bothered to submit it. Many thanks either way! –  user1878761 Dec 5 '12 at 17:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you need ofSeq functions for various collections, you might consider an approach similar to C# collection initializers. That is, make it work for any collection with an Add method. This also sidesteps your present problem.

open System.Collections.Generic
open System.Collections.Concurrent

module Dictionary =
  let inline ofSeq s = 
    let t = new ^T()
    for k, v in s do
      (^T : (member Add : ^K * ^V -> ^R) (t, k, v)) |> ignore
    t

module Collection =
  let inline ofSeq s = 
    let t = new ^T()
    for v in s do
      (^T : (member Add : ^V -> ^R) (t, v)) |> ignore
    t

open Dictionary

let xs = List.init 9 (fun i -> string i, i)
let d1 : Dictionary<_,_> = ofSeq xs
let d2 : SortedDictionary<_,_> = ofSeq xs
let d3 : SortedList<_,_> = ofSeq xs

open Collection

let ys = List.init 9 id
let c1 : ResizeArray<_> = ofSeq ys
let c2 : HashSet<_> = ofSeq ys
let c3 : ConcurrentBag<_> = ofSeq ys

Interestingly, you can even limit it to collection types with a specific constructor overload. For example, if you wanted to use structural equality you could do:

let t = (^T : (new : IEqualityComparer< ^K > -> ^T) (HashIdentity.Structural))
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. That would not have occurred to me. Thank you very much. –  user1878761 Dec 5 '12 at 22:46

For some reason the names of the type parameters have to match - this works fine for me

open System.Collections.Generic
type Dictionary<'TKey, 'TValue>  with
   static member ofList (xs:list<'k * 'd>) : Dictionary<'k, 'd> =
       let res = new Dictionary<'k, 'd> ()
       for (k, d) in xs do
           res.Add (k, d)
       res

I have no idea why this is the case (30 second look at the spec provides no clues either).

Update - the error is actually when the Dictionary parameters are the same as what is written in the method - doing

type Dictionary<'a, 'b>  with
   static member ofList (xs:list<'k * 'd>) : Dictionary<'k, 'd> =
       let res = new Dictionary<'k, 'd> ()
       for (k, d) in xs do
           res.Add (k, d)
       res

works just fine. This actually now makes sense. When the parameters are the same, there is an additional unspecified constraint - 'k:equality due to the new Dictionary<'k,'d>. However, for some reason, we can't put constraints in the extension definition (avoiding duplication?) so there is an error.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you able to reproduce the warnings when the parameters are called something else? I am using F# 3.0 with warning level 3. I get the same behaviour after renaming the type arguments I did before (i.e. warnings without the constraint, and a hard error with the constraint as shown in the question). What do you see please? –  user1878761 Dec 5 '12 at 11:30
    
The second solution successfully shuts up the warning (for whatever reason, seeing as the constraint is still very much needed). But there is now a new warning when I attempt to use the new method: "let f () = Dictionary.ofList [1,2]" will now complain that it cannot figure out what 'a and 'b are, and suggest I use something like Dictionary<_,_>.ofList. Any ideas on how to fix that please? –  user1878761 Dec 5 '12 at 11:38
    
@user1878761 - calling it with Dictionary<_,_>.ofList [1,1];; rather than Dictionary.ofList [1,1];; eliminates the error for me. –  John Palmer Dec 5 '12 at 11:40
    
JP: Many thanks for the answer. I will accept it in the next day or so unless someone else comes up with a way of solving the problem in some way does not require explict type arguments when Dictionary is instantiated. Thanks again. –  user1878761 Dec 5 '12 at 12:15
1  
See stackoverflow.com/a/7068107/82959 for the full explanation of what's going on. –  kvb Dec 5 '12 at 16:40

You won't be able to get rid of the warning, because you are referring to a type that doesn't exist, Dictionary as opposed to Dictionary<_,_>. You could make a Dictionary module if this is how you want to access it.

open System.Collections.Generic

type Dictionary<'a,'b>  with
  static member ofList (xs:list<'k*'v>) =
      let res = new Dictionary<_,_> ()
      for k, v in xs do
          res.Add (k, v)
      res    

module Dictionary = 
   let ofList xs = Dictionary<_,_>.ofList xs

Then you get rid of the warning.

Dictionary.ofList ["1",1;"2",2];;
val it : Dictionary<string,int> = dict [("1", 1); ("2", 2)]
share|improve this answer
    
I am not sure I understand. I write List.map all the time, and not List<_>.map. Does your argument apply to lists? –  user1878761 Dec 5 '12 at 15:42
    
List is a module in FSharp.core. List<_> is System.Collections.Generic.List<_>, two completely different things. The first is an immutable, singly linked list, and the second is a mutable list most commonly used in C#. –  Robert Jeppesen Dec 5 '12 at 15:45
    
The F# List module has no generic type parameters, and just contains functions to manipulate the F# List<'T> type. –  Robert Jeppesen Dec 5 '12 at 15:48
    
I really don't understand now. I obviously meant the immutable FSharp version, since the Generic.List does not have a map method. As a quick test, do you want to open MSVC, and see what intellisense suggests when you declare "type List with static member f = 123" versus "type List<'a> with static member f = 123". The latter contains [] and ::, whereas the former doesn't. In any case, I am pretty sure I can come up with a type that takes a type argument and does not require explicit type arguments to instanciate. In fact, let me attach one to the question. Can you please explain? –  user1878761 Dec 5 '12 at 16:10
    
Check kvb's link in the other answer. The fact that we're newing up a Dictionary is what causes the warning. I think putting 'ofList' in a module like above is a decent workaround though. –  Robert Jeppesen Dec 5 '12 at 19:22

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