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I'm porting my iPhone app to android and I'm having a problem with the string files now.

The app is a translation tool and users can switch the languages, so all the localized strings are in both languages and they are independent from what locale the OS is running.

For iOS version I have different files like de.strings, en.strings and fr.strings and so on. For every target with specified language pair I read the strings from the string tables, e.g. for de-fr I will include de.strings and fr.strings in project and set the name of the string tables in the info-list file and read strings from them. In the end I have one project containing different targets (with different info-list files) and all are well configured.

I'm intending to do the same on android platform, but

  1. Is only one strings.xml allowed per project?

  2. How do I set different build target? e.g. my de-fr and de-en translation app are actually two apps where the only difference is the language pairs. How can I set something so that I can use one project to generate the two apps? In XCode it's simple but I can't find a solution with eclipse.

  3. How do I specify per target which strings.xml it should read?

Thank you for your answers but Please Note that I need OS locale independent language settings, i.e. if the user changes OS locale from en to de, my app still shows localized strings in English. What I'm asking is actually how I can set something like prebuild and load different string files for different targets.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have your 'regular' strings.xml with the English language..

And then you can create folder for translations eg values-gr, values-it for greek and italian translations.

All you have to do, is copy strings.xml, to those folders, and translate them.

Then, each user, according to his/hers Android Settings will see your application in his/hers preferred language if available, and if not will see it in English.

Of course you can check the documentation. Its quite easy: Support Different Languages - Android

To change locale within the app, you can call this code:

Locale locale = new Locale("gr"); 
            Locale.setDefault(locale);
            Configuration config = new Configuration();
            config.locale = locale;
            getBaseContext().getResources().updateConfiguration(config, getBaseContext().getResources().getDisplayMetrics());

But gr locale must exist within your app.

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please note I need it to be independent from language setting, see my 'Please note'. I don't want my app to support different language in normal concept, but to load different string resources no matter how the language settings change. –  boreas Dec 5 '12 at 11:09
    
no I don't want to change the os locale in the app –  boreas Dec 5 '12 at 11:17
    
you want to load runtime different languages? Or to build eg 5 apps, each one on different language? –  Paschalis Dec 5 '12 at 11:17
1  
let's say I simply want to load different strings.xml files. and yes, build e.g. 5 apps, with different strings.xml –  boreas Dec 5 '12 at 11:20
    
Hmm... i dont know about this... but an easy workaround, is use the above code, with a constant for locale, and build it eg five times with 5 different languages you want. And after that, if you want to provide users a way to change languages, give them an options menu. Default locale in android is chosen by users in Android Settings. –  Paschalis Dec 5 '12 at 11:25

you have to put your localized strings in different folders like values-es, values-de, values-fr, etc.

The file must contain the same keys, for example in values folder:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="hello">Hello</string>
</resources>

in values-es folder:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="hello">Hola</string>
</resources>

and so on.

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No I don't simply need this. please read my 'please note' part –  boreas Dec 5 '12 at 11:20

You have to create one values folder for each language adding the language ISO code of the language you want to have a translation using this format: values-es, values-de, ... In each folder you have to add a strings.xml with strings of its language. The values folder (withoud country code) will be the default language.

For choose the string language you want to use:

import android.app.Activity;
import android.content.res.Configuration;
import android.os.Bundle;

public class Main extends Activity {
  /** Called when the activity is first created. */
  @Override
  public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    String languageToLoad  = "fa"; // your language
    Locale locale = new Locale(languageToLoad); 
    Locale.setDefault(locale);
    Configuration config = new Configuration();
    config.locale = locale;
    getBaseContext().getResources().updateConfiguration(config, 
    getBaseContext().getResources().getDisplayMetrics());
    this.setContentView(R.layout.main);
  }
}
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please note I need it to be independent from language setting, see my 'Please note' –  boreas Dec 5 '12 at 11:08
    
you can define in this mode the strings and change it like in this case: stackoverflow.com/questions/2900023/… –  frayab Dec 5 '12 at 11:16
    
I'm not intending to change the os language setting. –  boreas Dec 5 '12 at 11:24
    
see my edit please –  frayab Dec 5 '12 at 11:33
    
Thank you! but will this somehow change the os language setting? or just the language the app is using? I don't want it that way that the user exits the app and finds his os language setting is changed. –  boreas Dec 5 '12 at 11:37

ad 1. No you can have as many as you want. See ad 3 for more information.

ad 2. ????

ad 3. To make language selection in our app you should update context. Then proper xml will be selected automatically. Read about this to see how to do it.

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