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Within a for loop I am doing a Mongo DB Query, the loop contains 1500 iterations. So is there anyway that after 50 iterations, I want to give some time to the DB i.e. Thread.currentThread().sleep(200);

So please tell me how can I stop for a while after every 50:

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++){
    // ????
}
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if (0 == i % 50) then sleep. (i start from 1 is better) –  whunmr Dec 5 '12 at 11:04

8 Answers 8

you use modulo for this

if( i % 50 == 0 ){
    Thread.sleep(200);
}
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7  
Beware this sleeps even if i == 0 :D –  Jan Zyka Dec 5 '12 at 11:02

Use modulo like so:

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++){
      if( i%50 == 0){
         Thead.sleep(200);
      }
}

This will be true every time i is a multiple of 50

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An alternative to using modulo, which can use some cpu, is to use nested loops.

for (int j = 0; j < n; j += m) {
    // before every m
    for(int i = j; i < j + m && i < n; i++) {
        // inner
    }
    // after every m
}

this would be faster than %?

static int counter, counter2;

public static long testOneModLoop(int n, int m) {
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        counter++;
        if (i % m == m - 1)
            counter2++;
    }
    return System.nanoTime() - start;
}

public static long testTwoLoops(int n, int m) {
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int j = 0; j < n; j += m) {
        for (int i = j; i < j + m && i < n; i++) {
            counter++;
        }
        counter2++;
    }
    return System.nanoTime() - start;
}

public static void main(String... args) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        int runs = 10 * 1000 * 1000;
        double time1 = (double) testOneModLoop(runs, 50) / runs;
        double time2 = (double) testTwoLoops(runs, 50) / runs;
        System.out.printf("Avg time for 1 loop: %.2f ns and 2 loops: %.2f ns%n",
                time1, time2);
    }
}

prints

Avg time for 1 loop: 6.09 ns and 2 loops: 0.78 ns
Avg time for 1 loop: 3.75 ns and 2 loops: 0.22 ns
Avg time for 1 loop: 3.67 ns and 2 loops: 0.19 ns
Avg time for 1 loop: 3.72 ns and 2 loops: 0.19 ns
Avg time for 1 loop: 3.67 ns and 2 loops: 0.19 ns
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Just really curious, this would be faster than %? I would expect that computing the condition would take also some time ... really would love to know –  Jan Zyka Dec 5 '12 at 13:34
    
For trivial inner loops it would make a big difference. For non-trivial loop, you might not see one. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '12 at 13:41
    
@JanZyka I did a test and it's much faster for a trivial loop. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 5 '12 at 13:47
    
Cool, thanks for detailed explanation! +1 –  Jan Zyka Dec 5 '12 at 15:06
    
be careful: from what i could infer this microbenchmark looses a lot of time in getstatic/putstatic calls, up to the point where one version can be faster than another depending on whether the counters are static or local. –  soulcheck Dec 7 '12 at 10:18

I don't think this is generally good idea, but when you asked:

if (i % 50 == 0 && i!=0) {
// Do something
}
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I like paying attention to details, i != 0 got my vote –  Aviram Segal Dec 5 '12 at 11:09
    
Hehe, I love it too! That's the beauty of programming, isn't it? :) –  Jan Zyka Dec 5 '12 at 11:11

Regardless of how to sleep every 'n' queries, I wonder if this is really what you want to be doing. Instead of (I suspect) getting a list of ids back and then querying the db for each document, can't you submit a more suitable query to the db and let it make use of its presumably optimised query API to find/return info.

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Building on Peter Lawrey's answer you can just put it all in one loop and avoid both modulo and sleeping in the first iteration:

for (int i = 0, j = 0; i < n; ++i, ++j) { //we increment both i and j
     if (j == 50) {                       // reset auxilliary counter and go to sleep
          j = 0;                       
          Thread.sleep(100);
     }
}

edit

By the way if you're worried about performance you can stop every 64 (or another power of two) iterations and use the fact that

n % k == n & (k - 1) when k is a power of two and n > 0

This way you can change the relatively expensive modulo operation to cheap bitwise &. Using power-of-two sizes in programming is generally a good idea.

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for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
{   
    // You code here...

    if(i%50==0)
       Thead.sleep(200);
}
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you can write a simple condition inside for loop like:

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
 if(i % 100 == 0){// use 100 for 100 iterations and 50 for 50 iterations
   //your sleep code 
 }  
}
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