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For my project I'm working with anonymous classes in C++ and I was wondering where in memory they are allocated.

I'm pretty sure that will be allocated on the heap, but I would like to know if anyone else has more detailed information.

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how can you allocate an unnamed class on heap? –  neagoegab Dec 5 '12 at 11:23
7  
classes are not located anywhere –  user1773602 Dec 5 '12 at 11:23
    
of course, the object of anonymous type and variables declared inside! –  Velthune Dec 5 '12 at 11:33
    
@neagoegab: see chill's answer for how to do it directly in C++11. Of course in C++03 you can allocate an object of unnamed class on the heap if it's a subobject of something that does have a name. There's just no way to specify an unnamed type to new. –  Steve Jessop Dec 5 '12 at 12:07
    
@Steve Jessop, sorry but the ones from chill example are NAMED not anonymous. C++ DOES NOT support anonymous structs/classes. C11 does support anon. structs, example struct T { int tag; union { float x; int n; }; };. Also, how can you allocate something that you can not reffer to?... was a ironic question... –  neagoegab Dec 5 '12 at 15:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As pointed out, classes are not allocated anywhere. Objects, which are instances of an anonymous class can be allocated in several ways:

For example as subobjects of another object:

struct S
{
  struct {
    int x, y;
  } p;
};

or together with the class definition

struct
{
  float x, y;
} p;

or using decltype:

struct S
{
  struct {
    int x, y;
  } p;
};

void g (decltype (S::p)) {}

decltype (S::p) *f ()
{
  auto p = new decltype (S::p);
  g(*p);
  return p;
}
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If the anonymous class is part of another class or structure, then it will be allocated together with the surrounding class or structure, be it on the heap or on the stack.

If the anonymous class is a global variable, it's stored together with other global variables.

If the anonymous class is a local variable, it's stored on the stack together with the other local variables of the function it's defined in.

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1  
In short: the same place that the object would be if its class had a name. –  Steve Jessop Dec 5 '12 at 12:06

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