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I have a loop that may raise an exception on one or more iterations. I want the loop to complete, THEN raise the first exception encountered, in the following example "raise on 4".

Example code:

e = None
for x in range(10):
    try:
        print x
        if x == 4:
            raise Exception('raise on 4')
        if x == 6:
            raise Exception('raise on 6')
    except Exception as e:
        print e
        continue
else:
    if e:
        raise

Output:

0
1
2
3
4
raise on 4
5
6
raise on 6
7
8
9
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 7, in <module>
Exception: raise on 6

I can use the logging module to record them which is fine but I would like to raise on the first Exception if possible.

I am still fairly new to Python so I'm not entirely sure if the way I have constructed the loop with the "else" statement is very Pythonic or correct.

share|improve this question
    
error = None .... except Exception as e: if not error: error = e ... if error: raise error. –  khachik Dec 5 '12 at 11:30
    
Also, you don't need else after for, because you have no break in that for loop. else is executed when the loop condition is exhausted and is not executed when the loop is finished using break. So in your case else is completely useless. –  khachik Dec 5 '12 at 11:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to store e in a separate variable:

firste = None
for x in range(10):
    try:
        print x
        if x == 4:
            raise Exception('raise on 4')
        if x == 6:
            raise Exception('raise on 6')
    except Exception as e:
        if firste is None:
            firste = e
        continue

if firste is not None:
    raise firste

Now firste is only set when the exception is raised the first time.

You don't need to use else in this case. Only use it when your for loop contains a break statement, which would skip the else suite, otherwise just put the test for firste below the for loop without using the redundant else suite indentation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thankyou, I used the slimmed down version from khachik's comment but yours helped me understand the "is None", "not None" side of it, which I presume was intended... so thanks! –  jelloir Dec 5 '12 at 12:05

you can Append the errors to a list, and raise them later:

In [25]: errors=[]

In [26]: for x in range(10):
        try:
                print x
                if x == 4:
                        raise Exception('raise on 4')
                if x == 6:
                        raise Exception('raise on 6')
        except Exception as e:
                    errors.append(e)
                    continue
   ....:             
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

In [27]: for error in errors:
    raise error
   ....: 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Exception                                 Traceback (most recent call last)
<ipython-input-27-1f1d8ab5ba84> in <module>()
      1 for error in errors:
----> 2     raise error

Exception: raise on 4
share|improve this answer
    
the problem with this code is, it only raise the first error in errors and then the execution will be stopped (does not have the chance to raise the next error in errors) –  Mahshid Zeinaly Aug 12 at 17:55

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