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I have the following query:

SELECT fpa.scenario_id,
   fpa.facility_id,
   cge.CostGroupId result_total_id,
   mp_surrogate_id,
   CAST(SUM(fpa.raw_amount * cge.CostSign) AS DECIMAL(25, 13)) 
   result_total_amount         
INTO ADM_FactProfitTotalAmount_1
FROM #tempAmount fpa
JOIN ResultTest cge ON cge.CostId = fpa.process_id 
WHERE fpa.scenario_id = 1
GROUP BY fpa.scenario_id, fpa.facility_id, cge.CostGroupId, fpa.mp_surrogate_id
  • In #tempAmount I have 220 millions rows.
  • In ResultTest I have 150 rows.

I have an index on #tempAmount:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX #tempAmount_process_id
ON  #tempAmount(scenario_id, facility_id, mp_surrogate_id, process_id )

It takes around 1 hour to execute. Is it possible to optimize it?

EDIT:

I have created index on ResultTest column CostId, changed a bit other index and query

    CREATE CLUSTERED INDEX #tempFactAmount_index 
    ON  #tempAmount (process_id ,facility_id, mp_surrogate_id )

    SELECT  ISNULL(CAST(1 as BIGINT), 0) scenario_id,
            fpa.facility_id,
            cge.CostGroupId result_total_id,
            fpa.mp_surrogate_id,
            CAST(SUM(fpa.raw_amount * cge.CostSign) AS DECIMAL(25, 13)) result_total_amount         
    INTO ADM_FactProfitTotalAmount_1
    FROM ResultTest cge
    JOIN #tempAmount fpa ON cge.CostId = fpa.process_id 
    GROUP BY fpa.facility_id, fpa.mp_surrogate_id, cge.CostGroupId

Execution Plan:

41% insert into ADM_FactProfitTotalAmount_1

51% Hash Match Aggregate

2% Hash Match Inner Join

share|improve this question
1  
Do you have an index on process_id as well? From the JOIN condition, it would appear to be beneficial to have one defined. And moving the process_id to be the second index column may also help. Though, without a query plan it is difficult to tell where the bottleneck is. –  Oded Dec 5 '12 at 11:35
1  
Good webcast regarding optimizing selects: brentozar.com/archive/2012/10/… –  Oded Dec 5 '12 at 11:39
    
Try creating a CLUSTERED INDEX on #tempAmount just on column scenario_id. –  Daniel PP Cabral Dec 5 '12 at 11:45
    
How selective is fpa.schenario_id = 1 ? –  Gordon Linoff Dec 5 '12 at 15:06
    
I removed fpa.schenario_id = 1 from query, sorry for misleading, see may query below –  Andriy Kuzmych Dec 5 '12 at 15:08

3 Answers 3

First, I would suggest capturing the actual excecution plan. If you are running the query from SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS), turn on the "Include Actual Execution Plan" option. If this query is running from another program, run the SQL Server Profiler and turn on the Showplan Statistics Profile and/or the Showplan XML Statistics Profile. Review this profile and see if the query is behaving as you would expect.

Do you have an index on ResultTest colum CostId? With only 150 rows, an index scan on this table is not a big deal. If you don't have an index on this table, you might try it.

I wonder if the execution plan is performing nested loops to join to ResultTest. If so, that would be 150 X 220,000,000 = 33 billion operations. A hash join or merge join would perform much better if this is the case. You can force a particular join with a join hint OPTION (HASH JOIN) or OPTION (MERGE JOIN). This alone can make a huge difference.

The index on #tempAmount has a lot of columns that are not necessary for the SELECT query. Also, it is a NONCLUSTERED index. Is there also a CLUSTERED index? If not, you could try converting it to CLUSTERED and get rid of the other columns. This will reduce the size of the index and should perform better, because all the rows for a scenario_id will be contiguous.

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  • i suggest start from checking the Estimated Execution Plan.
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191194.aspx

  • the multiple column index can be used only when it's left prefixed. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/multiple-column-indexes.html

    so i suggest move process_id next to scenario_id, because they are used in where and join.

    CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX #tempAmount_process_id ON #tempAmount(scenario_id, process_id, facility_id, mp_surrogate_id)

  • the last one: let OS to cache your disk blocks to memory as more as possible. in linux before some performance critical database put on production, do "cat your_database.store.file > /dev/null". A lot of disk read will be hit from the memory cache.

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In scenarios like this I have found that summing the amounts in the larger table before joining to the smaller table often help. So in this case I would use the following:

;WITH SUMCTE
AS
(
SELECT      fpa.facility_id,
            fpa.mp_surrogate_id,
            fpa.process_id,
            SUM(fpa.raw_amount) AS total_amount         
    FROM #tempAmount fpa 
    GROUP BY fpa.facility_id, fpa.mp_surrogate_id, fpa.process_id
)
SELECT  CAST(1 as BIGINT) AS Scenario_id,
        facility_id,
        cge.CostGroupId result_total_id,
        mp_surrogate_id,
        CAST(SUM(SCT.total_amount * cge.CostSign) AS DECIMAL(25, 13)) result_total_amount         
    INTO ADM_FactProfitTotalAmount_1
    FROM ResultTest cge
    JOIN SUMCTE SCT ON cge.CostId = SCT.process_id 
    GROUP BY fpa.facility_id, fpa.mp_surrogate_id, cge.CostGroupId

If there is only one row in ResulTest per process_id I would simplify further by removing the outer group by:

;WITH SUMCTE
AS
(
SELECT      fpa.facility_id,
            fpa.mp_surrogate_id,
            fpa.process_id,
            SUM(fpa.raw_amount) AS total_amount         
    FROM #tempAmount fpa 
    GROUP BY fpa.facility_id, fpa.mp_surrogate_id, fpa.process_id
)
SELECT  CAST(1 as BIGINT) AS Scenario_id,
        facility_id,
        cge.CostGroupId result_total_id,
        mp_surrogate_id,
        CAST((SCT.total_amount * cge.CostSign) AS DECIMAL(25, 13)) result_total_amount         
    INTO ADM_FactProfitTotalAmount_1
    FROM ResultTest cge
    JOIN SUMCTE SCT ON cge.CostId = SCT.process_id 
share|improve this answer

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